First look at plans for major development in King’s Lynn

An overview of the Nar Loop and wetland Picture: West Norfolk council

An overview of the Nar Loop and wetland Picture: West Norfolk council - Credit: Archant

Consultation has started over a major development alongside King's Lynn's historic quarter.

A poster advertising the consultation Picture: Chris Bishop

A poster advertising the consultation Picture: Chris Bishop - Credit: Archant

Plans for the Nelson Quay development have been on display in the Tuesday Market Place for two days.

From Thursday, November 22, people will be able to have their say online.

The trailer, on the Tuesday Market Place, had council officers and staff from their partners in the development, Aecom, Bidwells and Graeme Massie Architects, to questions and to explain the development in more detail.

Jemma Curtis, the council's regeneration and programmes manager, said: 'We have had a steady flow of people since yesterday, seeming interested and asking questions.'

An artist's impression of part of the scheme Picture: West Norfolk council

An artist's impression of part of the scheme Picture: West Norfolk council - Credit: Archant


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James Alflatt, head of the EIA service within the planning division at Bidwells said: 'Everyone seems on board, people are keen to get something on the site.

'I think people are just wanting a better idea of what is going on the site, but they are liking the proposals, especially the park.'

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Some 430 homes and more than 7,500 sqm of commercial space including shops and cafes are proposed for the combined sites of South Quay and Boal Quay. A pond and a new pedestrian/cycle bridge are also included.

Council cabinet member Alistair Beales said: 'This is a major project for the town, that will really transform the riverfront area. We have had lots of discussions with various stakeholders and hope that the proposals are heading in the right direction. We now want to see what other people think so that final adjustments can be made before we submit the scheme for planning permission.'

Feedback from the public will be considered before a formal planning application is tabled ealy next year. Work could begin in 2020.

In the 18th Century the Boal Quay was an extremely profitable port for the whaling industry. Three or four vessels a year would bring back 20 whales which would be stripped of their blubber and boiled down to make lamp oil.

Examples of the whaling community is still apparent in the town with Blubberhouse Creek on the River Nar, where whales were rendered down and the Greenland Fishery, a 17th Century whalers' tavern which survives on Bridge Street.

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