Prom cycling ban lifted in Great Yarmouth and Gorleston after ‘successful’ trial period

Great Yarmouth esplanade North of Britannia Pier. Picture: James Bass

Great Yarmouth esplanade North of Britannia Pier. Picture: James Bass - Credit: Eastern Daily Press © 2013

A ban on prom cycling is set to be permanently lifted, after a five-month trial was hailed a success.

Great Yarmouth esplanade North of Britannia Pier. Picture: James Bass

Great Yarmouth esplanade North of Britannia Pier. Picture: James Bass - Credit: Eastern Daily Press © 2013

Pedalling along Gorleston's lower esplanade and Great Yarmouth's north esplanade had been prohibited by a byelaw.

This was lifted from May until September, and officers said fears of accidents and crashes between pedestrians and cyclists had faded by the end of the trial.

A report reads: 'Initially both trials were met with opposition in the local press, with many letters from pedestrians published with anecdotal claims that they had near misses with cyclists or that the trial would end up with someone being injured.

'However, in reality both trials have been successful.


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'There have been no reported incidents between cyclists and pedestrians along either section of promenade reported to Norfolk police or Great Yarmouth Borough Council during the trial period.'

The seafront enforcement officer added he was not aware of any incidents, although an increased number of complaints were received for an area not included in the trial.

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These concerned cyclists using the esplanade between Euston Road car park and Wellington Pier.

Resistance to the trial had initially seen a formal complaint lodged by the Norfolk branch of Living Streets, a group which 'stands up for pedestrians'.

John Peacock, the group's chairman, said collisions between bikes and people do occur but are rarely recorded.

But Neil Turner, founding member of Great Yarmouth Cycling Club and Activating CIC, believed it would work as long as cyclists nad pedestrians co-operated.

Cabinet members were told of the benefits of lifting the byelaw at a town hall meeting on Wednesday.

These include allowing children a safe place to learn to cycle, helping to attract visitors to the town and to help make cycling fun.

More than 60 seaside resorts across the country already allow cycling on their promenades.

A new byelaw banning cycling is set to be imposed on Gorleston's upper promenade - not covered by the current byelaw.

Officers said this was due to concerns at the speed which cyclists can reach on the slopes from the upper to the lower promenade.

The trial period at Gorleston had been agreed after a Gorleston Area Committee meeting in April.

An alternative of a painted cycle lane was dismissed as it would have had a 'negative effect' on the look of the area.

The shared path, used by cyclists and pedestrians, was consistent with Department for Transport guidelines and did not prompt concerns from sustainable transport charity Sustrans.

Cabinet members agreed to lift the byelaw affecting Gorleston's lower promenade and Yarmouth's north esplanade on Wednesday.

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