Project continues to inspire future engineers in Lowestoft

Somerleyton primary school pupils taking part in a science day part of the Royal Academy of Engineer

Somerleyton primary school pupils taking part in a science day part of the Royal Academy of Engineering Lowestoft project. Building a paddle boat. Picture: James Bass - Credit: Eastern Daily Press © 2016

Engineers of tomorrow have been taking advantage of a new ground-breaking project from the Royal Academy of Engineering.

Somerleyton primary school pupils taking part in a science day part of the Royal Academy of Engineer

Somerleyton primary school pupils taking part in a science day part of the Royal Academy of Engineering Lowestoft project. Picture: James Bass - Credit: Eastern Daily Press © 2016

Pupils from Somerleyton Primary School participated in the exciting programme of interactive activities, learning further about the engineering sector in the process.

Somerleyton Primary School headteacher Louise Spall said: 'This project has made the children aware of the wider context of jobs available to them in the engineering sector, thinking about things they would never have thought about before.

'It is a great way of building for their future.'

Children from key stage two took part in the engineering workshop conducted by Steve Smyth, and his wife Jen, from the Royal Academy of Engineering.

Somerleyton primary school pupils taking part in a science day part of the Royal Academy of Engineer

Somerleyton primary school pupils taking part in a science day part of the Royal Academy of Engineering Lowestoft project.Isaac Harrowven with his group battery operated moving cow.Picture: James Bass - Credit: Eastern Daily Press © 2016


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The hands-on-session, held on Tuesday, saw pupils creating trains, paddle steamers and cows.

They then followed a story, written by Mr Smyth, linking to Victorian entrepreneur Samuel Morton Peto.

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The interactive tale featured a cow travelling from Denmark to Somerleyton via train and a paddle steamer.

Mr Smyth explained: 'We are really pleased with this project and the great thing about the story is that it enables the children to relate skills they have learnt to a practical scenario and later on they will act as teachers, retelling the story to younger pupils.'

The aspiring engineers used teamwork to solve problems and construct their mechanical creations. In the afternoon they held workshops demonstrating to younger pupils skills learnt from earlier activities.

Lynda Mann, head of five-19 education at the Royal Academy of Engineering, added: 'This activity will set a child up for the future, with engineering employers looking for future employees; the skill base the children are developing will allow them to get engineering jobs, not only in Lowestoft, but across the UK.'

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