Poster at scene of Lowestoft acid attack is a sign victim Adele Bellis will not be broken

Acid attack victim Adele Bellis by the bus stop that she was attacked at with a giant poster of her

Acid attack victim Adele Bellis by the bus stop that she was attacked at with a giant poster of her new book.PHOTO: Nick Butcher - Credit: Nick Butcher

Many people who had been the victim of a horrific assault would understandably be scared to return to the place of the incident which changed their lives forever.

Lowestoft acid attack victim Adele Bellis who has an upcoming autobiography being launched.Picture:

Lowestoft acid attack victim Adele Bellis who has an upcoming autobiography being launched.Picture: James Bass - Credit: James Bass

But the victim of a dreadful acid attack which scarred her for life has not only gone back to the scene of the crime but defiantly put her own poster there – to show her attackers she won't be beaten.

Adele Bellis lost an ear and was left partially bald, with severe burns down the side of her face and body, after her controlling ex-boyfriend Anthony Riley paid accomplice Jason Harrison to carry out the attack at a Pakefield bus stop in August 2014.

Miss Bellis spent much of the next year in hospital undergoing treatment, including a stay at a specialist burns clinic in France.

And after releasing her new book, Brave, about her struggle against domestic abuse in the lead-up to the attack, Miss Bellis knew exactly where she wanted a promotional poster to go.


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'I wanted the advert at the bus stop where the attack took place to prove to everyone that I would not be broken by what happened,' she explained.

'He thought that day would ruin me but that place is now actually advertising the book, so a positive has come out of it.

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'On that day I thought my life was over but standing there with my book advertised at the bus stop was a proud moment.

'To think I was standing there two years ago after this happened to me - it shows how far I've come.'

Miss Bellis first went back to the bus stop in London Road South shortly after Riley was convicted of a series of abuse last year.

However the strength of her recovery and defiant spirit now means she goes past the bus stop as if it were any other.

'It doesn't mean anything to me,' she said.

'It's like any other bus stop.

'Sometimes I think I should feel scared, but I don't.'

Brave, published by HarperCollins, aims to help other women recognise the signs of domestic abuse.

The 24-year-old has also said she wants to use what happened to her as a positive, by going into schools to educate children on domestic abuse and campaign for greater support.

Have you got a Lowestoft story? Email andrew.papworth@archant.co.uk

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