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Fly-tippers in west of county facing bigger fines ahead of campaign launch

PUBLISHED: 16:31 28 December 2018 | UPDATED: 11:28 29 December 2018

Fly-tippers in West Norfolk are facing bigger fines ahead of the launch of a countywide campaign Picture by Jerry Turne

Fly-tippers in West Norfolk are facing bigger fines ahead of the launch of a countywide campaign Picture by Jerry Turne

Archant

People in the west of the county have been warned they may face greater fines if they fail to dispose of their waste properly - even if they are not the ones who have dumped it.

Ian Devereux, right, with John Fisher launching Norfolk Waste Partnership's Christmas campaign earlier this month. Photo: Angela SharpeIan Devereux, right, with John Fisher launching Norfolk Waste Partnership's Christmas campaign earlier this month. Photo: Angela Sharpe

West Norfolk Council is currently looking to clampdown on fly-tipping in its borough and as part of this is proposing a hike in the fines it dishes out for this.

A report going before its cabinet on Tuesday, January 8, proposes the council adopt fixed penalty notices of £300 for people who fly-tip their waste, when the offence is on a small enough scale that it doesn’t warrant court prosecution.

Ian Devereux, cabinet member for the environment, said the move was to bring the council in line with other local councils ahead of the launch of a Norfolk-wide awareness campaign next month from the Norfolk Waste Partnership.

However, it is not just those who dump the waste that could face punishment, with a separate fine being introduced for people who the waste belongs to.

The council is looking to introduce a ‘householder duty of care’ fine, which would see homeowners fined £200 should they be found to have disposed of waste through an unlicensed provider.

Mr Devereux said: “The report is part of the lead up to the launch of a campaign next month called ‘Scrap It’, which will look at tackling fly-tipping across the county.

“While we would still look to prosecute for major offences, these would be measured against the same evidence and the hope is this would provide the same deterrent against smaller scale incidents.”

Mr Devereux added that since the introduction of additional charges at recycling centres, he had received several reports of fly-tipping from people in his ward - even though the number of incidents in west Norfolk was down on 2017.

He added: “I just think people do not want to pay extra for disposing of things such as white goods, perhaps that’s austerity taking its toll.

“The people I feel most for is farmers - we are a rural county and often people dump things on agricultural land. Then it is up to the farmers to clean it up, which is not fair.”

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