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Plans for 22 new homes and coffee shop in Norfolk village given go-ahead

PUBLISHED: 14:22 07 November 2018 | UPDATED: 15:29 07 November 2018

Architect impression of the proposed development of 22 new homes off Norwich Road in Dickleburgh. Picture: La Ronde Wright Ltd/Chapel Farm Partnership

Architect impression of the proposed development of 22 new homes off Norwich Road in Dickleburgh. Picture: La Ronde Wright Ltd/Chapel Farm Partnership

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A housing development in a South Norfolk village that would include a community for older people as well as a hairdresser’s and coffee shop have been approved.

The existing bungalow on Norwich Road in Dickleburgh that will be demolished to make way for a new housing development. Picture: GoogleThe existing bungalow on Norwich Road in Dickleburgh that will be demolished to make way for a new housing development. Picture: Google

Outline proposals for 22 new homes on land west of Norwich Road in Dickleburgh were given the go-ahead by South Norfolk Council’s development management committee today despite objections from neighbouring homeowners.

The scheme will see the demolition of an existing bungalow and the building of seven custom-build new homes, seven affordable homes and eight accessible dwellings for older people to be called “Rosie’s Place”.

The development, which it is proposed will feature road names linked to the 100th Bomb Group which were based at nearby Thorpe Abbots in the Second World War, also includes commercial units that would be used for a hairdresser’s and coffee shop and a new public open space.

Plans for the proposed development of 22 new homes off Norwich Road in Dickleburgh. Picture: La Ronde Wright Ltd/Chapel Farm PartnershipPlans for the proposed development of 22 new homes off Norwich Road in Dickleburgh. Picture: La Ronde Wright Ltd/Chapel Farm Partnership

In their submission developers Chapel Farm Partnership, who own 23 acres of land between Norwich Road and the A140, said the homes for older people could be configured to provide a community and adapted to meet the needs of occupants. It would also feature flexible spaces providing services and activities such as physiotherapy and yoga.

They stated: “The accessible homes for older people would help older members of the community to remain in the area, but within accommodation better suited to their changing needs. The affordable homes would help young families to remain in the area.”

Dickleburgh Parish Council opposed the plans saying they would add to traffic problems in the village and over ongoing concerns over sewerage flooding to nearby properties on Norwich Road.

Dickleburgh Parish Council and nearby residents had objected to plans for 22 new homes on land off Norwich Road. Picture: © Evelyn SimakDickleburgh Parish Council and nearby residents had objected to plans for 22 new homes on land off Norwich Road. Picture: © Evelyn Simak

Andrew Goodman, parish council vice chairman, also objected because the development would be outside the settlement boundaries.

He said: “If this is accepted it will send out the wrong message.”

Several residents on Norwich Road also raised objections that the new homes would overlook their properties, add to pressures on village services and exacerbate flooding problems.

Granting conditional permission, the planning committee heard the scheme including the provision of affordable housing represented sustainable development and that the commercial unit to be used as a hairdresser’s and coffee shop would enhance the village’s vitality.

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