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'Where are we going to put our cars?' Mixed reaction to calls for pavement parking ban

PUBLISHED: 17:01 05 April 2019 | UPDATED: 08:41 06 April 2019

Parking on pavements is necessary for many living in old terraced streets which were built before cars were invented but can be frustarting for pedestrians. Picture: Neil Didsbury

Parking on pavements is necessary for many living in old terraced streets which were built before cars were invented but can be frustarting for pedestrians. Picture: Neil Didsbury

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A charity's calls for a total ban on pavement parking has been met with a mixed reaction from people in the county.

Parking on pavements is necessary for many living in old terraced streets which were built before cars were invented. Picture: Neil DidsburyParking on pavements is necessary for many living in old terraced streets which were built before cars were invented. Picture: Neil Didsbury

After a law was agreed in principle in Scotland to prevent vehicles from mounting kerbs, national charity Living Streets made calls for England to follow suit.

Stephen Edwards, a director at Living Streets, argued it makes life incredible dangerous to wheelchair users, those with loss of sight and parents with buggies.

And while his sentiments have been echoed by some in the county, others feel there is little choice but to do so.

David Roberts, chairman of the Wymondham Access Group, said: “I totally agree a ban should happen. WAG is constantly battling with lorries on footways in town and contractors and big businesses parking on pavements. The issue is enforcement. Abusers know there is no-one to enforce which is why they carry on.”

Eric Kirk chairman of the Magdalen Street Traders Association said: “The police say it is illegal to drive on the footpath, so the question is, how did you park?

“We should have a blitz on the issue of cars and vans totally blocking the footpath and if vehicles do park on the path we need a law to say a minimum of 1.1 metres must remain.”

However, in other areas the feeling is that some households have no other option but to mount the pavement.

Cypress Street in Norwich, like many others, has permit parking available along both sides of the street. However, its width means cars must mount the pavement to allow others through.

Alison McGuiness finds it difficult pushing wheelchair user Barbera Smith along roads where vehicles are parked on pavements. Picture: Neil DidsburyAlison McGuiness finds it difficult pushing wheelchair user Barbera Smith along roads where vehicles are parked on pavements. Picture: Neil Didsbury

James Tooke, 78 and of Cypress Street, said: “If there is a ban where else are we going to put our cars. Every night the cars on this street are parked bumper to bumper, so where would they go otherwise?”

The situation is mirrored on neighbouring Harford Street, where cars routinely line the street, mounting the kerb.

Richard Monkcom, a 39-year-old shop worker, said: “I think it is a good suggestion but many roads were built before many people have cars so we don’t really have that much choice.”

Your views

Peter Aldred from Lowestoft can see both sides of teh argument for parked cars on pavements. Picture: Neil DidsburyPeter Aldred from Lowestoft can see both sides of teh argument for parked cars on pavements. Picture: Neil Didsbury

In an online poll participated in by more than 600 people, 67pc of those who took part said pavement parking should be banned.

Teresa Rush, a 26-year-old student who lives in Norwich, said: “I think it should be allowed as it is helpful - especially on narrow roads.”

Alison McGuinness, 64 of Southwell Road in Norwich, said: “I think a ban would be a good idea - if somebody has to use a wheelchair or mobility scooter certain roads are just impossible for them to get down.”

Peter Aldred, a 43-year-old buyer from Lowestoft, said: “I can see it both ways. As a parent I can see how it can be awkward having to manoeuvre around cars on the pavement.

Richard Monkcom has to park his car half on a pavement near his home in Norwich. Picture: Neil DidsburyRichard Monkcom has to park his car half on a pavement near his home in Norwich. Picture: Neil Didsbury

“However, on the flip side if you live on a narrow street and park on the road you won’t want to wake up and find your wing mirror lying on the floor because there wasn’t enough space to pass.”

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