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D-Day veteran WILL move into care home after council u-turn over decision to refuse him a place

PUBLISHED: 07:53 01 February 2019 | UPDATED: 09:30 01 February 2019

Normandy veteran Len Mann will move to Halsey House for respite care after initially being refused help with funding by the council. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Normandy veteran Len Mann will move to Halsey House for respite care after initially being refused help with funding by the council. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Archant

A D-Day veteran who told of his anguish after being refused a place in a care home will now get the support he wants following a council u-turn.

Len Mann will be going to Halsey House, Cromer, for respite care. Picture: Sonya DuncanLen Mann will be going to Halsey House, Cromer, for respite care. Picture: Sonya Duncan

Len Mann, 94, was refused funding by Norfolk County Council to partially pay for fees at the Royal British Legion’s Halsey House care home in Cromer.

The council said it would help Mr Mann explore his options and offer him support to enable him to live independently in his own home for as long as possible.

But Mr Mann told this newspaper that he felt he was being “treated like muck” after the council refused to pay around half of the £700 care home fees following an assessment on Wednesday, January 23.

He said he was unable to look after himself at his home in Parana Close, Sprowston, Norwich, and wanted to spend the last years of his life at a care home dedicated to ex-servicemen and women.

After a public backlash over their decision, the council visited him again on Tuesday, January 29, and offered him respite care at Halsey House.

A council spokesman said: “The assessment revealed that his level of need had changed so we are making arrangements for him to receive respite care at the care home of his choice – Halsey House.

“Just to stress that we have always been in very close contact with Mr Mann and understanding of his needs as he has been receiving reablement support in his home from our Norfolk First Support team for some time – and that has entailed two visits per day.

“The assessment team has also been in close contact with him. The close contact will continue - during his respite stay and to agree longer term care and support options.”

Mr Mann’s daughter, Beryl Hall, 75, who also lives in Sprowston, was delighted with the news but said no date has been given yet of when he will move to the care home.

She added: “I just can’t believe it, it’s happened at last, we are just so pleased.

“He is over the moon about it, we have gotten our lives back.”

Mr Mann was 19 years old when he fought on the beaches on D-Day June 6, 1944. In 2016, he was awarded France’s highest honour - the Légion d’honneur.

In his later years he has collected donations for the poppy appeal and was vice chairman of Sprowston British Legion and chairman of Norwich Normandy Veterans.

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