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Factory to store 150,000 tonnes of rubbish gets permission

PUBLISHED: 14:13 16 October 2020 | UPDATED: 14:13 16 October 2020

The entrance to the site where a new Veolia waste transfer station will be built on Longwater Industrial Esate in Costessey. Picture: Sophie Wyllie

The entrance to the site where a new Veolia waste transfer station will be built on Longwater Industrial Esate in Costessey. Picture: Sophie Wyllie

Sophie Wyllie

A factory which would store almost 150,000 tonnes of waste has been given the go-ahead, despite a raft of objections that it would lead to noise, smells, pollution and congestion.

Tim East, Norfolk county councillor for Costessey. Picture: Bill SmithTim East, Norfolk county councillor for Costessey. Picture: Bill Smith

The plans for the waste transfer station, off Ernest Gage Avenue on the Longwater Industrial Estate at Costessey, were approved by Norfolk County Council’s planning committee.

Councillors voted by eight to three to grant permission for the facility on a former scrap metal site, near Longwater Retail Park.

That was despite objections from Costessey Town Council, Costessey Liberal Democrat county councillor Tim East and people living nearby.

The town council had said it was “concerned that local residents will be subjected to noise, smells, nuisance and disturbance” and that it would create more traffic.

Bev Spratt, Conservative county councillor. Pic: Norfolk Conservatives.Bev Spratt, Conservative county councillor. Pic: Norfolk Conservatives.

Other objections from people living nearby included fears over an increase in rats and gulls, devaluation of local homes and air pollution.

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Concerns were also raised it could compromise plans for a second road leading in and out of the Queen’s Hill estate.

Mr East called for the developer - Veolia - to have to contribute, through a section 106 agreement, to upgrade the pedestrian crossing in William Frost Way and to upgrade the Longwater Interchange to ease congestion.

Labour county councillor Danny Douglas. Picture: ANTONY KELLYLabour county councillor Danny Douglas. Picture: ANTONY KELLY

But, the report by council officers said the scheme would not have any unacceptable impacts on nearby roads and a contribution to highway improvements was not needed.

Conservative councillor Bev Spratt, on the concerns over rats, said: “The people of Norfolk have got to get used to rats. You can trap them, poison them or whatever, but there will still be rats, so I dismiss that worry.”

But Labour councillor Danny Douglas said it would “exacerbate” traffic problems. He said: “I’m really unhappy with this application.”

Veolia said the site, which would employ 44 people, would help divert materials away from landfill. The company said it would be a “short-term storage point” for 149,000 tonnes of non-hazardous household, commercial and industrial waste, including food, dry mixed recyclables and non-recyclable general waste, each year.

The rubbish would then be driven to other sites for “further recycling or recovery”.


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