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Revealed: Where thousands of new homes could be built in and around Norwich

PUBLISHED: 16:37 18 December 2019 | UPDATED: 16:37 18 December 2019

The Carrow Works site., where 1,200 homes could be allocated after Colman's and Unilever closed their factories. Picture: Archant library

The Carrow Works site., where 1,200 homes could be allocated after Colman's and Unilever closed their factories. Picture: Archant library

Archant

The possible locations where thousands of new homes could be built in Norwich, South Norfolk and Broadland over the next 20 years have been revealed.

A map showing where homes would be allocated if the Greater Norwich Local Plan is approved. Picture: Broadland District Council, Norwich City Council, South Norfolk District Council.A map showing where homes would be allocated if the Greater Norwich Local Plan is approved. Picture: Broadland District Council, Norwich City Council, South Norfolk District Council.

The draft version of a blueprint for where the housing could be built - known as the Greater Norwich Local Plan - has been published, ahead of councillors agreeing to put it out for consultation.

The plan sets out a vision for growth, identifies sites for new homes, jobs and infrastructure and will be used to make decisions on planning applications.

Inclusion does not mean planning permission will be granted, but it does make it more likely councillors will approve future applications.

The plan provides opportunities for about 44,500 new homes over the next 20 years. More than 80pc are being carried forward from existing plans, but the new plan needs to identify sites for almost 8,000 further new homes.

Over the past two years, the Greater Norwich Development Partnership - made up of Norwich City Council, Broadland District Council, South Norfolk Council and Norfolk County Council - had invited landowners to put forward sites for those 8,000 new homes.

Those submissions have now been evaluated, and the draft plan includes the following allocations.

Norwich (4,395 further homes on top of 26,165 already allocated)

The former Colman's/Unilever site at Trowse is one of the new sites proposed to be allocated for a potential development of 1,200 homes, following the closure of the Carrow Works factories.

The Deal Ground site, which is due to be allocated in the latest Greater Norwich Local Plan. Pic: Archant Library.The Deal Ground site, which is due to be allocated in the latest Greater Norwich Local Plan. Pic: Archant Library.

In Sprowston, 1,200 homes could be built on land near White House Farm, close to the recent housing development.

Some 1,400 homes could be allowed on land between Fir Covert Road and Reepham Road near Thorpe Marriott.

Other Norwich sites already included are:

Anglia Square - where a planning inquiry will determine if Norwich City Council was right to agree to a revamp scheme for 1,200 homes.

Aylsham could see 300 new homes. Picture: STUART ANDERSONAylsham could see 300 new homes. Picture: STUART ANDERSON

The Deal Ground - where permission was granted for 670 homes in 2013, but where construction has yet to start.

Market towns - Wymondham, Aylsham, Diss, Harleston and Long Stratton (1,250 further homes on top of 5,092 already allocated)

In terms of new allocations:

Aylsham could see 300 new homes built on land to the south of Burgh Road. But officers say it would mean a new primary school would be needed.

Shaun Vincent, Broadland District Council leader and chairman of the Greater Norwich Development Partnership. Pic: Broadland District Council.Shaun Vincent, Broadland District Council leader and chairman of the Greater Norwich Development Partnership. Pic: Broadland District Council.

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In Diss, 400 homes could be allocated on two sites, one west of Heyford Road and one at Frontier Agriculture Ltd in Sandy Lane.

In Harleston, sites for 300 homes at Briar Farm and 150 south of Spirketts Lane could be allocated, while 100 could be spread across two in Wymondham.

Key service centres - Acle, Blofield, Brundall, Hethersett, Hingham, Loddon/Chedgrave. Poringland/Framingham Earl. Reepham and Wroxham (515 homes on top of 2,902 already allocated)

The largest new allocations would be for 200 homes on two sites in Acle and 200 at two sites in Loddon and Chedgrave.

Hethersett was already earmarked for 1,369 new homes.

Other villages (1,200 new homes on South Norfolk sites and 480 in Broadland)

A further 480 homes, on top of 955 already earmarked, would be allocated in other parts of Broadland, while a separate plan will come up with suggested sites for at least 1,200 homes in village clusters in South Norfolk, on top of 1,349 already allocated.

No garden villages

Three submissions which would have seen new garden villages created have not been selected as preferred sites - for now.

Submissions had been put in for developments at Honingham, Hethel and Silfield.

The draft plan states: "No new settlement is proposed at this time as a significant proportion of the allocated sites are strategic scale commitments of 1,000 homes plus and the establishment of any new settlement is likely to take a long time."

However, officers added: "The longer-term development of a new settlement could be a suitable option in the future. This should be considered in the next review of this plan."

What next?

The Greater Norwich Development Partnership will consider the draft plan on January 6. If it is endorsed, it will then be considered by the city council and two district councils later than month.

If approved, it will then go out for public consultation at the end of January.

Shaun Vincent, chair of the Greater Norwich Development Partnership, said: "Greater Norwich is a great place to live, work and invest.

"We need to make sure that future growth brings benefits for all and provides for a sustainable future.

"It's really important that people get involved in this consultation and have their say on the plan and the sites proposed across Broadland, Norwich and South Norfolk".

MORE: Where thousands of new homes could be built across Norfolk


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