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Revealed: Dozens hit with dog-fouling ‘Asbos’

PUBLISHED: 07:00 01 October 2020 | UPDATED: 07:13 01 October 2020

Councils in Norfolk and Waveney used ASBO-style measures to tackle dog-fouling and anti-social behaviour dozens of times last year. Photo: James Bass

Councils in Norfolk and Waveney used ASBO-style measures to tackle dog-fouling and anti-social behaviour dozens of times last year. Photo: James Bass

Archant Norfolk © 2016

Councils in Norfolk and Waveney used ASBO-style measures to tackle dog-fouling and anti-social behaviour dozens of times last year, figures have revealed.

Councils in Norfolk and Waveney used ASBO-style measures to tackle dog-fouling and anti-social behaviour dozens of times last year. Photo: James BassCouncils in Norfolk and Waveney used ASBO-style measures to tackle dog-fouling and anti-social behaviour dozens of times last year. Photo: James Bass

Authorities issued the community protection notices (CPNs) and public space protection orders (PSPOs) a total of 25 times in 2019.

The measures replaced anti-social behaviour orders (ASBOs) and dog control orders and are issued by councils and the courts.

Data collated by a civil liberties research organisation revealed the extent of the powers’ use across England and Wales in 2019.

A total of 8,760 CPNs were made by 202 councils from November 2018 to October 2019, researchers at the Manifesto Club found.

The figure was a rise of more than 2,500 on the previous year and the most ever recorded.

READ MORE: Dog-fouling incidents up by almost 800pc in Broadland

Councils issued 10,413 PSPOs in 2019, a rise of 483 on 2018.

In Norfolk and Waveney, King’s Lynn and West Norfolk council issued the most, giving out nine orders in relation to music, alcohol-related disorder, cycling on pedestrian areas, and dangerous or nuisance cycling.

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The council also used the powers to secure a property and clear waste and to address foul and abusive language and offensive hand gestures.

Norwich city council and East Suffolk council both issued four CPNs, for issues of waste disposal, anti-social behaviour, noise, lighting fires and pitching tents.

Broadland council issued three CPNs for anti-social behaviour, while Breckland, Great Yarmouth and North Norfolk district councils did not use CPNs at all.

READ MORE: Just one fine issued for dog fouling despite powers of Norfolk councils

PSPOs were issued twice in 2019 by East Suffolk council - for dog fouling and not being on a lead - and Great Yarmouth council- for dog fouling, while Broadland council issued one for dog fouling.

Manifesto Club director Josie Appleton, said: “These blank-cheque busybody powers are the cause of immense injustice, and a fundamental threat to our freedoms. They should be removed from the statute book.”

A West Norfolk council spokesman said CPNs were a “useful tool, designed to tackle a range of persistent and continuing behaviours deemed to be having a detrimental impact on the quality of life of others”.

Kevin Maguire, from Norwich city council, said: “We work hard to engage with people around issues of anti-social behaviour and most people respond to this. On the rare occasions where this doesn’t work, we will use CPNs where we have to, in order to help individuals and communities.

“Four notices in a 12-month period is unbelievably low and this is testimony to all the hard work that goes on by the area management team.”

READ MORE: Call to respect park after littering and drug taking near children’s play area


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