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Police plans for special cusody suite

PUBLISHED: 08:00 24 June 2006 | UPDATED: 11:05 22 October 2010

Police yesterday unveiled plans to hold criminals from Norfolk and Cambridgeshire at a specially constructed "prison" in King's Lynn.

Police yesterday unveiled plans to hold criminals from Norfolk and Cambridgeshire at a specially constructed "prison" in King's Lynn.

The proposed police investigation centre would provide 24 cells on land close to homes and businesses on the Willows Business Park.

It is one of a number of sites across Norfolk, Suffolk and Cambridgeshire which have been earmarked for police custody suites as part of a £55m project.

West Norfolk borough councillor Charles Joyce said the plan was likely to prove unpopular with local residents.

"People in south Lynn feel if there is a problem then the authorities will dump it on them," said Mr Joyce, who represents south and west Lynn.

"If there was a police station with all the regular facilities associated with it there probably wouldn't be any concern, but this has been described as a prison, with people being help for up to 24 hours and probably far more when further time is needed for questioning."

A police spokesman said the project would help reduce costs and ease pressure on custody cells across East Anglia.

Project manager for Norfolk police, Peter Belson, said: "Once built, the new facility will benefit both Norfolk and Cambridgeshire constabularies, which is a significant milestone.

"Norfolk is delighted to have worked with Cambridgeshire to secure this site. It's widely recognised that current custody provision does not meet the requirement or needs of modern day policing across the three counties."

The Lynn "prison" is one of nine being built across the region as part of the three counties Police Investigation Centre Project.

Norfolk police have also bought land at the Gateway 11 Business Park, Wymondham, Aylsham Business Estate and further sites in Ipswich and Peterborough.

Work on the Lynn site is expected to be completed by 2009.


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