Plans to build wood-burning power station in Great Yarmouth

Library image of Great Yarmouth power station at South Denes adjacent to the site of the proposed bi

Library image of Great Yarmouth power station at South Denes adjacent to the site of the proposed biomass station. Picture: James Bass - Credit: Eastern Daily Press � 2006

Proposals to build a wood-fired power station in Great Yarmouth have been submitted.

Library image of wood pellets similar to those which could be burnt in the proposed power station. P

Library image of wood pellets similar to those which could be burnt in the proposed power station. Photo: Archant Library - Credit: Archant

The project would see a small biomass plant built at a site in South Denes Road, which turns wood pellets into gas to be burned.

The company behind the scheme, London-based Energy Circle, said it was too early this stage to comment.

Plans lodged with Great Yarmouth borough council state the pellets would otherwise be destined for landfill and would comprise 90-95pc wood.

Most of the pellets would be shipped in, with some coming by lorry.


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The plans state: 'The emissions from the engines are less than conventional diesel engines, well within required environmental limits.'

The waste wood will be processed off-site and delivered as wood chip by sea with a proposed 15-20 ship berthings a year.

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There is potential for 20pc to be delivered by road and the pellets will be stored off site.

The process will use the latest technology to gasify the wood to produce a gas which will drive engines to produce up to 6MW electricity and 9MW heat.

The electricity will be supplied to the gas-powered plant already in South Denes, and heat to neighbouring businesses and to dry the wood beforehand.

Construction will take 12-18 months and the operation could create 12-15 full-time jobs with further labour requirements for ship unloading.

The development will comprise of 2,000sq.m (21,500 sq.ft) with a building for an office, an area for gasification and one for the engine house.

The process of advanced gasification converts the biomass to a 'syngas' which is dried, cooled and filtered and is then fed into reciprocating engines.

A custom built steel vessel will be constructed to burn the wood and will see temperatures of 1,000°C inside, twice as hot as the surface of the planet Mercury.

According to the documents, the emissions from the engines will fall within acceptable limits for Nitrous Oxide (NOx) and particulates. No other pollutants are present in the exhaust.

The process produces a carbon rich ash which will be sold as a fertiliser.

The nearest residential development is 200m (656ft) away.

What do you think? Send your thoughts by email to george.ryan@archant.co.uk

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