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Security guard builds Canaries club badge out of 100,000 matchsticks

Phil Hampshire and his son Cody Hampshire-Long with the model of the Norwich City Football Club crest which has been with thousands of matchsticks. Picture: Jamie Honeywood

Phil Hampshire and his son Cody Hampshire-Long with the model of the Norwich City Football Club crest which has been with thousands of matchsticks. Picture: Jamie Honeywood

Jamie Honeywood Archant Norwich Norfolk

It has taken 100,000 matchsticks and hours of labour with only glue and a Stanley knife.

Phil Hampshire has created a model of the Norwich City Football Club crest out of thousands of matchsticks. Picture: Jamie Honeywood Phil Hampshire has created a model of the Norwich City Football Club crest out of thousands of matchsticks. Picture: Jamie Honeywood

But a security guard from Caister has spent the close football season creating a massive model of the Norwich City Football Club badge, complete with green and yellow glitter.

Phil Hampshire has been building matchstick models for almost 30 years, ever since his passion was stoked when he created a replica of Big Ben - The Queen Elizabeth Tower - as a child.

Using hundreds of thousands of matches, the 56-year-old has previously built huge models of both Norwich cathedrals.

Norwich Cathedral rose eight feet high and took Mr Hampshire two and half years to complete, and the model of the Roman Catholic Cathedral is on display in the building itself.

Phil Hampshire and his son Cody Hampshire-Long with the model of the Norwich City Football Club crest which has been with thousands of matchsticks. Picture: Jamie HoneywoodPhil Hampshire and his son Cody Hampshire-Long with the model of the Norwich City Football Club crest which has been with thousands of matchsticks. Picture: Jamie Honeywood

The model of Norwich Cathedral was bought by an artist in Lowestoft for £250.

Mr Hampshire first began building matchstick models in 1990 "to pass the time" during long night shifts.

"If you are working 12 hour night shifts that is a long time to be sat doing nothing," he said.

The idea for a club badge began when Norwich City won promotion back to the Premier League.

Phil Hampshire has also made other matchstick models of Norwich landmarks. Picture: Jamie HoneywoodPhil Hampshire has also made other matchstick models of Norwich landmarks. Picture: Jamie Honeywood

"I started it at the end of last season, and I wanted to finish it before the start of the season," said Mr Hampshire.

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"I wanted to do it for charity and I don't know anyone at the club, but I was hoping someone at the club would be able to sell it at the first match of the season.

"I just want to raise a bit of money for a children's charity."

The sale of the Norwich City Football Club crest made with matchsticks will hopefully raise money for a local charity. Picture: Jamie HoneywoodThe sale of the Norwich City Football Club crest made with matchsticks will hopefully raise money for a local charity. Picture: Jamie Honeywood

Part of the summer has been spent making smaller models of six of the 20 Premier League club badges.

But Mr Hampshire said: "I lose interest quite quickly in things. I did about six before I got fed up.

"I will probably not now do anything more for a long, long time. When I get into the zone of doing it I am working on them quite a lot."

Mr Hampshire said he wanted to badge to be sold, hopefully at the first home game of the season on August 17 against Newcastle, with the proceeds going to a local children;s charity.

Phil Hampshire has also made models of other premier league clubs crests but on a much smaller scale. Picture: Jamie HoneywoodPhil Hampshire has also made models of other premier league clubs crests but on a much smaller scale. Picture: Jamie Honeywood

"I don't sell my stuff, I give it all away," he said. "I don't like to put a price on it because I do it all for fun.

"If you sell them it stops being fun and starts becoming an occupation. I do these because I want to do them."

The ideal scenario for Mr Hampshire would be for the badge to end up on display at Carrow Road.

"I don't really want it to go to a big charity," said Mr Hampshire. "I think a lot of money is wasted at big charities so I would sooner it go to a local charity who will use the money properly."

He added while he would not have room in his own house to keep all his models, he enjoys going to see them on display.

"It is nice to see them again," he said. "They are like old friends."

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