Pensioner charged with murdering toddler “must” live in Great Yarmouth

Ten people, including six women - are standing trial at Norwich Crown Court accused of subjecting yo

Ten people, including six women - are standing trial at Norwich Crown Court accused of subjecting young children to sexual and physical abuse over more than a decade. - Credit: Archant

A Great Yarmouth pensioner charged with murdering his ex-partner's toddler son almost 50 years ago has 'exceptionally' been granted bail.

David Dearlove, 70, is accused of murdering 19-month-old Paul Booth, from Haverton Hill, Stockton, Teesside, who died in hospital in October 1968.

Dearlove, of Wolseley Road, Yarmouth also faces a charge of child cruelty.

The defendant has lived in Yarmouth with his wife of 36 years and has no previous convictions.

He did not enter pleas during the brief hearing at Teesside Crown Court via video-link from Holme House Prison on Wednesday, but at a hearing before magistrates two days earlier his solicitor said he would deny the offences.


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On that occasion he was remanded in custody but Judge Simon Bourne-Arton has now granted him bail.

Nick Dry, prosecuting, told the Crown Court that Dearlove was the then partner of Paul's mother, who died in the 1990s.

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Applying for bail Paul Cleasby said investigations have been going on for 18 months and Dearlove surrendered himself to police when required.

Judge Bourne-Arton told Dearlove: 'Exceptionally in a case of this kind I am going to grant you bail.'

The defendant must surrender his passport, not interfere with witnesses and live in Great Yarmouth.

A hearing will take place on March 10, when a trial date could be set.

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