Passengers faced delays on trains

Train services were said to be getting back to normal tonight after delays on the Norwich to London mainline following a suspected suicide. Services were severely disrupted after a man jumped between the tracks and in to the path of the 1.

Train services were said to be getting back to normal tonight after delays on the Norwich to London mainline following a suspected suicide.

Services were severely disrupted after a man jumped between the tracks and in to the path of the 1.38pm London Liverpool Street to Lowestoft service in the Seven Kings area of Essex at about 2pm.

A British Transport Police spokeswoman said the incident was not being treated as suspicious and that no-one onboard the train had been injured. The dead man, who has not yet been identified, was taken to East Ham mortuary in London.

Services were stopped and four lines including the Norwich to London mainline in both directions were closed following the incident.

By 3.32pm three of the four lines had been reopened but services were still disrupted with bus and coach replacement services in operation.

The Norwich to London mainline was reopened in both directions by 4.17pm.

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The spokeswoman said: “Services are recovering well and the full Intercity service will be running by the evening and this should be relatively unaffected. Two of the lines were opened quite quickly, but the other two have taken a bit longer to reopen.

“We are currently working towards a normal service. There have been delays but hopefully the main line should be running normally for commuters travelling to Norwich by the evening. However, Metro services between London and Shenfield are still disrupted.”

Earlier today trains on the Norwich to London line were slowed at Diss after a lorry got stuck under a railway bridge.

Motorists were forced to turn around and find an alternative route after the lorry became wedged under the bridge in Sandy Lane shortly before 9am.

A Norfolk Police spokeswoman said that officers went to assist at the scene, but when they arrived at 9.15am they found the lorry had already been removed. She said it appeared the lorry had taken the brunt of the damage.

In a separate development, the latest train passenger customer satisfaction ratings were unveiled yesterday .

The results of the Spring 2007 National Passenger Survey are based on responses from more than 25,000 rail passengers conducted in January to March this year.

Some 72 per cent of passengers regarded their service with One as satisfactory or good, 16 per cent put neither/nor, indicating they were neither satisfied or dissatisfied, and 11 per cent were dissatisfied or considered it poor.

With Central Trains, 83 per cent of passengers regarded their service as satisfactory or good, 10 per cent put neither/nor and seven per cent were dissatisfied or considered it poor.

In a statement One said: “The results indicate that progress continues to be made in comparison with the Spring 3006 survey, with satisfaction ratings for One railway customers improved in a number of categories including, the cleanliness and upkeep of trains, availability of staff and their helpfulness in how customer enquiries were handled, and in other areas such as ticket-buying facilities and car parking.”

Central Trains managing director Steve Banaghan said: “This is very good news for Central Trains customers. It shows that our investment in information technology, staff training and new ways of working with other organisations are all making a positive difference. These improvements are clearly reflected in our passengers' travelling experience.”

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