Wherry art raises funds for lockdown-hit nature study centre

Artist John Daynes with How Hill director Simon Partridge. Picture: Richard Batson/How Hill Trust

Artist John Daynes with How Hill director Simon Partridge. Picture: Richard Batson/How Hill Trust - Credit: Archant

A popular Broads nature study centre will receive a welcome boost to its lockdown-hit finances, thanks to an amateur artist.

A close-up of the artwork. Picture: Richard Batson/How Hill Trust

A close-up of the artwork. Picture: Richard Batson/How Hill Trust - Credit: Archant

How Hill Trust at Ludham is being boosted by a piece of wherry artwork from a retired teacher from Oulton Broad.

John Daynes is a huge fan of the How Hill environmental study centre at Ludham, and the wherry Hathor which normally has a summer ‘residency’ at its moorings.

John Daynes with one of his wherry prints at How Hill. Picture: Richard Batson/How Hill Trust

John Daynes with one of his wherry prints at How Hill. Picture: Richard Batson/How Hill Trust - Credit: Archant

So he has created a set of 25 limited edition stencil cut prints showing Hathor rounding a reed lined river bend near the centre, which will raise funds towards its education work.

Mr Daynes said: “I feel strongly about the work How Hill does – introducing children to the environment and helping them understand the ecology we need to look after.”


You may also want to watch:


He and wife Helen have been visiting How Hill for more than 30 years to savour the historic house and grounds.

He added: “It’s like a second home and I had my 70th birthday there, because the view is stunning.”

Most Read

The couple also have long-running ties with Hathor, John as crew, and Helen doing refreshments.

He offered his artwork to the How Hill Trust charity which has run the centre since 1984, taking it over from the county council.

Thousands of children have learned about nature during day and residential visits, but Covid has wiped out school trips and the income they bring to fund the centre’s work.

Mr Daynes, who was deputy head at a middle school in Lowestoft, added: “How Hill, like so many organisations are finding this year very difficult, so it seemed right to help them generate some money through my picture.”

How Hill director Simon Partridge said: “We have had no school visits through lockdown and none expected until at least next Easter, which means no main source of income and seven of our 10 staff furloughed.

“Our only income has been donations from visitors to our gardens, so fantastic gestures like John’s are so welcome and shows us that people care about How Hill and the work it does.”

The framed Hathor prints measure 31cm x 38.5cm and are £40 each.

To order please call the centre on 01692 678555 or learn more about How Hill Trust via howhilltrust.org.uk

Mr Daynes’ work can also be seen at an art and craft show at Hoveton Village Hall on November 14-15 in aid of the Wherry Maud Trust.

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter
Comments powered by Disqus