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Quiz - how well do you know Norwich?

PUBLISHED: 20:01 20 April 2020 | UPDATED: 20:01 20 April 2020

The Britons Arms is one of six thatched buildings within the city walls - where are the others?  Picture: Simon Finlay

The Britons Arms is one of six thatched buildings within the city walls - where are the others? Picture: Simon Finlay

From hidden streams to vanished buildings, plus a cast of colourful characters, how hot is your Norwich knowledge?

Welcome to a history quiz based on one of Norwich’s much-loved walking tours. Our multiple choice picture quiz includes some of the sights you might see on the City of Centuries tour, which normally runs twice daily through the summer from Norwich Tourist Information Centre.

Although the tours are suspended, some of the expert guides are finding new ways of exploring the city. Roger Smith has found some fascinating facts for this picture quiz.

“Norwich has got an incredible history and being a compact city it doesn’t take long to go anywhere,” said Roger, 73, who is one of more than 20 Norwich city guides, who have each completed an intensive nine-month training course. He described the City of Centuries tour route, from the Forum to the Cathedral, as ‘the whole history of the city in a nutshell.’

Where is this and what does it mark? Picture: DENISE BRADLEYWhere is this and what does it mark? Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

And he has a bonus question – with the chance to win a prize:

The Britons Arms is one of only six thatched houses within the old city walls. A 16th century law banned thatched roofs in Norwich after a number devastating fires. Where are the city’s other five thatched houses? Email your answers to Norwich tour guide Roger Smith at canaryrog@hotmail.co.uk by Monday April 27 and he will pick two winners who will each receive a pair of tickets for a city tour when they restart.

For more information, or a tour leaflet, contact Norwich Tourist Information Centre email tourism@norwich.gov.uk

What is this outlet for and where is it? Picture: DENISE BRADLEYWhat is this outlet for and where is it? Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Once you’ve done the quiz - find out more:

1 The swan’s head at the bottom of Swan Lane is on one of the posts marking the Norwich Lanes area. There are marker posts at most of the intersections in the Lanes, coloured red for the cloth dye from the roots of the madder plant, once used here. The Norwich Lanes area was a focus of the cloth industry, which was boosted in the 16th century when experts from Flanders were invited to bring their skills to the city. The symbols on top of each post are relevant to the streets and include a swan, a goat and a lobster.

On which famous gateway is this and whose arms are they?  Picture: DENISE BRADLEYOn which famous gateway is this and whose arms are they? Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

2 Several streams, called cockeys, once ran through the city. However, with concerns about the spread of disease they were covered over from the early 15th century. The largest was the Great Cockey which ran from All Saints Green, down Westlegate, and flowed into the Wensum opposite the Playhouse. This grille is where it flows into the river.

3 The Bassingham gateway was moved from a London Street jewellers in 1857 and placed in the south side of the Guildhall. Above the ornate archway are the arms including those of the Goldsmiths Company.

How can you see exactly where this Norwich market cross, painted by 18th century artist Thomas Hearne, once stood?How can you see exactly where this Norwich market cross, painted by 18th century artist Thomas Hearne, once stood?

4 The old market cross of 1503-1732 was also a chapel. A plaque in the pavement between Davey Place and the market shows where it was once thought to stand but a 21st century renovation of the market revealed it covered an area now marked in pink through the stalls.

5 Peter the wild boy. George 1 was visiting Hanover in 1724 when his huntsmen found a naked boy who moved around on all fours, climbed trees with ease and communicated in grunts. The King was fascinated by this Wild Boy and brought him back to the royal court. He was later looked after in Hertfordshire but wandered off and was found in Norwich, where he had been imprisoned in the Bridewell as a potential Spanish spy. He was returned to Hertfordshire but is remembered in Norwich on a Lanes marker post beside the Bridewell and in the name of the nearby Wild Man pub.

Who is this? Picture: DENISE BRADLEYWho is this? Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

6 During preparations for the opening of the shop Working Title in Bridewell Alley symbols of some of the old city gates were found, at the corners of the window frames, including Ber Street gate, with its tower.

7 Augustine Steward’s house in Tombland Alley was built in 16th century. He was a cloth merchant, became Mayor of Norwich three times and was an MP for the city. He helped persuade Henry VIII to let the city buy St Andrews and St Blackfriars halls in 1540 to save them from destruction. The oak beams of his house would have been cut while still green and have dried and become distorted over the years. The door high in the wall was for goods to be hoisted directly in, as this rear part of the house was a weaving workshop.

Where is this symbol and which old city gate does it represent? Picture: DENISE BRADLEYWhere is this symbol and which old city gate does it represent? Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

8 At the top south west corner of the Guildhall is a relic of brutal medieval punishments. People who had committed minor crimes were tied to the ring to be flogged.

Where is this house and why are the beams wavy? Picture: DENISE BRADLEYWhere is this house and why are the beams wavy? Picture: DENISE BRADLEY


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