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WATCH: Alarming 'urbex' videos show teenagers rooftopping seven-storey building in Norwich

PUBLISHED: 16:51 13 May 2019 | UPDATED: 09:11 15 May 2019

A YouTube video shows a group of Norwich teenagers climbing a seven-storey building in a social media craze called rooftopping. Picture: Fresh Horizon/YouTube

A YouTube video shows a group of Norwich teenagers climbing a seven-storey building in a social media craze called rooftopping. Picture: Fresh Horizon/YouTube

Fresh Horizon/YouTube

A group of Norwich teenagers have been branded as 'stupid' after performing death-defying stunts on tall buildings in a social media craze called rooftopping.

A YouTube video shows a group of Norwich teenagers climbing a seven-storey building in a social media craze called rooftopping. Picture: Fresh Horizon/YouTubeA YouTube video shows a group of Norwich teenagers climbing a seven-storey building in a social media craze called rooftopping. Picture: Fresh Horizon/YouTube

The dangerous trend has been flooding Instagram and YouTube, which sees young adults dangle off high rise buildings in so-called urban exploration 'urbex' videos.

The Norwich teens, some of whom have blurred their faces in videos on YouTube, are seen clambering up tall buildings around the city centre wearing masks and hi vis jackets.

The self-confessed 'trouble makers and law breakers' admit their stunts are 'dangerous and poses a health and legal risk'.

A YouTube video shows a group of Norwich teenagers climbing a seven-storey building in a social media craze called rooftopping. Picture: Fresh Horizon/YouTubeA YouTube video shows a group of Norwich teenagers climbing a seven-storey building in a social media craze called rooftopping. Picture: Fresh Horizon/YouTube

In one video, the teenagers, who call themselves Fresh Horizon, climb atop the Grosvenor House building in Prince of Wales Road on the day of the Norwich City promotion parade on May 6.

After missing the parade they decide to scale the seven-storey building by pulling themselves up railings of a scaffolding tower, before running across the rooftop and sitting on the edge with their legs dangling off the building.

In some cases, urbex is a popular hobby for those with a keen interest in photography and history, who explore abandoned buildings to discover more about its past.

A YouTube video shows a group of Norwich teenagers climbing a seven-storey building in a social media craze called rooftopping. Picture: Fresh Horizon/YouTubeA YouTube video shows a group of Norwich teenagers climbing a seven-storey building in a social media craze called rooftopping. Picture: Fresh Horizon/YouTube

A Norfolk police spokesman confirmed these types of incidents are a civil trespass and not a criminal matter, and so the police would not get involved.

The owner of Grosvenor House, property developer Regency Residential, said the scaffolding is being removed.

A spokesman said: "We take health and safety very seriously at all properties managed by Regency Living and do not condone the actions of the individuals in the film.

A YouTube video shows a group of Norwich teenagers climbing a seven-storey building in a social media craze called rooftopping. Picture: Fresh Horizon/YouTubeA YouTube video shows a group of Norwich teenagers climbing a seven-storey building in a social media craze called rooftopping. Picture: Fresh Horizon/YouTube

"No access was left available to the public. We ask that members of the public refrain from climbing on any scaffolding that is currently in place."

One man who lives in Grosvenor House, who was unaware of the trespass, randomly came across the video on YouTube.

BT engineer Mark Taylor, 24, had been searching for videos of the parade when he recognised his building in the footage.

A YouTube video shows a group of Norwich teenagers climbing a seven-storey building in a social media craze called rooftopping. Picture: Fresh Horizon/YouTubeA YouTube video shows a group of Norwich teenagers climbing a seven-storey building in a social media craze called rooftopping. Picture: Fresh Horizon/YouTube

Mr Taylor said there is no access to the roof of his building with the exception of a staircase which is locked at all times.

He added that he had emailed the group asking whether they had permission to enter the rooftop.

He said: "It's pretty stupid behaviour, isn't it?

"When I was younger I didn't do that kind of thing, I would mess about and to go to abandoned buildings but they are dancing around on the edge and sneaking into a building that I live in."

On their YouTube profile the teens claim the abandoned buildings and rooftops they explore is within the law under civil trespass and that they will 'happily leave the premises when asked and therefore are not committing any criminal offences.'

In an email exchange with Mr Taylor, the group said: "All the activities committed are civil trespass, we do not damage property and do not force entry we are within the law.

"We're just teenagers doing it for fun we don't pose a threat to anyone or anything and do not mean harm by our videos we are sorry for the stress caused."

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