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What has happened to the St Stephen’s underpass artwork of Norwich homeless man?

PUBLISHED: 16:01 09 March 2019 | UPDATED: 13:42 10 March 2019

One year on after Sergiusz Meges was killed in St Stephen's underpass in Norwich.
PHOTO BY SIMON FINLAY

One year on after Sergiusz Meges was killed in St Stephen's underpass in Norwich. PHOTO BY SIMON FINLAY

Passers-by who regularly walk through St Stephen’s underpass in Norwich will undoubtedly have come across a mural dedicated to rough sleeper Sergiusz Meges.

The art mural of Norwich homeless man Sergiusz Meges has been temporarily taken out of St Stephen's underpass. Picture: Dave HannantThe art mural of Norwich homeless man Sergiusz Meges has been temporarily taken out of St Stephen's underpass. Picture: Dave Hannant

But the recognisable face of the 29-year-old homeless man, who was found dead in the underpass in 2015, has been missing from the spot it once stood for almost a month.

Those wondering about its whereabouts need not fear - the mural was taken out temporarily for Theatre Royal’s Creative Matters - Living with Homelessness exhibition.

One year on after Sergiusz Meges was killed in St Stephen's underpass in Norwich.
PHOTO BY SIMON FINLAYOne year on after Sergiusz Meges was killed in St Stephen's underpass in Norwich. PHOTO BY SIMON FINLAY

Artist Devin Smith, who painted the mural, said: “[Theatre Royal] reached out to me for the some existing artworks I had created for individuals in poor mental health, addiction and homelessness.”

Sergiusz Meges died as a result of the injuries he sustained on the night of 9/10 June 2015, which an inquest heard could have been from a “kick, stamp or possibly a forceful punch to the left side of the lower chest” but may also have been a fall.

New artwork in St Stephen's Underpass organised by Life in a Fine City. Art work remembering Sergiusz Meges by Devin Smith.
Picture by SIMON FINLAY.New artwork in St Stephen's Underpass organised by Life in a Fine City. Art work remembering Sergiusz Meges by Devin Smith. Picture by SIMON FINLAY.

The exhibition, which launched on February 1, has since ended and the mural will be placed back in the underpass.


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