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Beauty therapist had been on flight days before cosmetic surgery, inquest hears

PUBLISHED: 15:11 29 October 2019 | UPDATED: 16:41 29 October 2019

Louise Harvey from Norwich, who died 17 days after a breast augmentation. Photo: Facebook

Louise Harvey from Norwich, who died 17 days after a breast augmentation. Photo: Facebook

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A beauty therapist from Norwich who died from a blood clot following cosmetic surgery had been on a three-hour flight eight days before her operations, her mother has told an inquest.

Louise Harvey, a mother-of-three, died on July 5, 2018 after undergoing the procedures in London on June 17, 2018.

A post-mortem examination recorded that the 36-year-old died of a bilateral pulmonary embolism, a blood clot that occurs in the lungs.

Secondary causes were recorded as breast augmentation and abdominoplasty, the medical term for a tummy tuck.

Linda Harvey, 53, said that her daughter had been on a family holiday to Bulgaria, with flights of around three hours each way, from June 3 to June 9, 2018.

Norfolk's area coroner Yvonne Blake read a statement from Mrs Harvey to Tuesday's hearing in Norwich.

In the statement, Mrs Harvey said the flights were from Norwich Airport to Bulgaria direct and "I believe were just over three hours each way".

She said it was her daughter's first time on a plane and she had been "very excited" about the flights and the holiday.

Anaesthetist Thaventhran Prabhahar, who worked on Ms Harvey for the cosmetic surgery, said that a flight would only have been a consideration if it was long-haul of more than five hours and "a week or five days within surgery".

He added that he had not been aware of Ms Harvey's flight at the time.

Dr Prabhahar said surgeon Manish Sinha, who performed the operations, told him that Ms Harvey would be treated as high risk.

"Once we decided we were going to treat it that way, I didn't probe into it," he said, adding that he did not know if it was due to family history of blood clots or due to Ms Harvey having a contraceptive injection.

He said the treatment pathway would have been the same with both.

Dr Sinha said earlier in the inquest that he was not aware of Ms Harvey's family history of blood clots at the time of the surgery.

Dr Prabhahar said that if the risk with Ms Harvey was "anything more serious then you would have expected it to be investigated".

He said he was not aware that a prescribed dose of blood thinners was not administered four hours after Ms Harvey's surgery, adding: "We work in a team and you expect everyone to play their role."

Ms Blake asked nurse Belinda Baldwin why she had not administered the blood thinners as prescribed.

"It could have been that I actually forgot it, or that it was an oversight," she said.

The inquest heard the blood thinners were prescribed to be given at midnight on the evening of the surgery but were not administered until 8.15am the next day, June 18, 2018.

Ms Blake asked if there had been confusion over timings, and if a form stating the blood thinners should be administered at "00:00" on June 18 2018 could have been misunderstood.

The nurse said she could not remember.

The inquest heard that a second dose of blood thinners was not administered and was crossed off on paperwork.

Ms Baldwin said she did not cross off any medications on paperwork, explaining that she was "not allowed" to do so.

Lawyer Tim Deeming of Tees Law, who is representing the family, said after Tuesday's hearing: "Louise was a loving, hard-working, dedicated mother, daughter and friend to many and is greatly missed.

"We hope that through such investigations, changes and improvements can and will be made to help raise standards and prevent other families having to go through such tragic circumstances.

The inquest continues.

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