Norwich drone firm’s footage of the Broads used in BBC documentary

Footage from the BBC documentary Britain's Lost Waterlands: Escape to Swallows and Amazons Country.

Footage from the BBC documentary Britain's Lost Waterlands: Escape to Swallows and Amazons Country. Picture: BBC - Credit: Archant

Birds-eye shots of the Broads captured by a Norwich drone firm have been featured in a documentary on life afloat the waterways.

Footage from the BBC documentary Britain's Lost Waterlands: Escape to Swallows and Amazons Country.

Footage from the BBC documentary Britain's Lost Waterlands: Escape to Swallows and Amazons Country. Picture: BBC - Credit: Archant

Ikopta's clips of landmarks including Hickling Broad's Stubb Mill and St Benet's Abbey, as well as shots from the Suffolk coast, were broadcast on Wednesday night during the BBC's Britain's Lost Waterlands: Esscape to the Swallows and Amazons Country, a look at the landscapes which inspired children's author Arthur Ransome to pen his adventure series.

Dylan Baldwin, managing director of Ikopta, said their involvement in the documentary had been a quick turnaround.

'We actually worked with them on another project, coming out later this month, looking at Julian of Norwich,' he said, 'and they liked what we had done so asked us to help out.'

After three days filming in late May, one above the Broads, another in Felixstowe and the third in Walton-on-the-Naze, the aerial shots were collected.

Footage from the BBC documentary Britain's Lost Waterlands: Escape to Swallows and Amazons Country.

Footage from the BBC documentary Britain's Lost Waterlands: Escape to Swallows and Amazons Country. Picture: BBC - Credit: Archant

But Mr Baldwin said the drones had to battle against the typical Great British summer conditions.

He said: 'We were fighting with the weather quite a lot - it's not been the best summer for filming.

Most Read

'Drones don't like the rain, firstly, and rain and wind can also cause mist on the lens which is difficult to clear.'

But he said the footage came out well - and that they were pleased with the end result.

'Drones are quite good at getting that sense of travel, geography and scope - it gives you almost the same effect as you would get from using a helicopter,' he said.

'We were really pleased with how much of our clips they got into the final project in the end.'

The hour-long show is divided between the Lake District, the Broas and the Suffolk Coastline, and meets Nick Acheson of the Norfolk Wildlife Trust. It delves into the history of the Broads and the harvesting of Norfolk reed.

The documentary on Julian of Norwich, the first woman to write a book in English, saw Ikopta shoot drone footage above Norwich Cathedral, Mousehold Heath and Julian's Bridge.

It is due to be broadcast on BBC Four later this month.

To watch the first documentary, visit http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer• Do you have a Broads story for us? Email lauren.cope@archant.co.uk

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter