Meet the photographer who walked the entire perimeter of Britain

Professional photographer Quintin Lake, from Norwich, began his 7,000 mile journey on April 17, 2015

Professional photographer Quintin Lake, from Norwich, began his 7,000 mile journey on April 17, 2015 in the hope of learning more about our mysterious island nation. Picture: Quintin Lake - Credit: Archant

A Norfolk-born photographer has shared some breathtaking images of the region’s coastline after walking the perimeter of the country.

Professional photographer Quintin Lake, from Norwich, began his 7,000 mile journey on April 17, 2015

Professional photographer Quintin Lake, from Norwich, began his 7,000 mile journey on April 17, 2015 in the hope of learning more about our mysterious island nation. Picture: Quintin Lake - Credit: Archant

Professional photographer Quintin Lake, from Norwich, began his 7,000-mile journey on April 17, 2015, in the hope of learning more about our mysterious island nation.

Mr Lake started at St Paul’s Cathedral and followed the coast clockwise until finishing his journey on September 15, 2020, after going through seven pairs of shoes, tearing a tendon and taking almost 180,000 photos.

A picture of the Norfolk horizon at Brancaster. Picture: Quintin Lake

A picture of the Norfolk horizon at Brancaster. Picture: Quintin Lake - Credit: Archant

“I felt I got more than I wanted out of the trip,” He said. “I have such a wealth of material now and it’s been extraordinary.

“Each county is like a collection of clans and each one is so different.

Breakfast by the coast path, Brancaster. Picture: Quintin Lake

Breakfast by the coast path, Brancaster. Picture: Quintin Lake - Credit: Archant


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“It felt really meaningful coming back to Norfolk and the place where I was born.”

Mr Lake arrived at the border between Lincolnshire and Nelson’s county just before the UK went into national lockdown at the end of March.

Quintin Lake set up camp in the dunes at Brancaster just before coronavirus lockdown hit the UK. Pic

Quintin Lake set up camp in the dunes at Brancaster just before coronavirus lockdown hit the UK. Picture: Quintin Lake - Credit: Archant

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“Everything became very quiet,” he said. “I stayed in a youth hostel in Wells and I was the only person there.

“I had a feeling of anxiety as I came through Sheringham and as things became a little more consuming I decided to go home and spend lockdown with my family.”

Cley Windmill. Picture: Quintin Lake

Cley Windmill. Picture: Quintin Lake - Credit: Archant

After returning home to Cheltenham for 17 weeks and walking around with a bag full of books to make sure he could return to his journey at full strength, Mr Lake came back to Sheringham on July 20.

“It was a lovely feeling going through north Norfolk, there was this incredible sense of sky, space and freedom. One of my first memories of the coast was Brancaster, so it was great to be back.

The beach at Cromer. Picture: Quintin Lake

The beach at Cromer. Picture: Quintin Lake - Credit: Archant

“I didn’t know King’s Lynn very well and was blown away by the checkered buildings. It was also amazing to see the seals at horsey and the thumb prints of the sea at Blakeney Point.”

See more of Quintin Lake’s photos and buy prints at theperimeter.uk

A fingerprint of the sea at Blakeney Point. Picture: Quintin Lake

A fingerprint of the sea at Blakeney Point. Picture: Quintin Lake - Credit: Archant

The Beach at Great Yarmouth. Picture: Quintin Lake

The Beach at Great Yarmouth. Picture: Quintin Lake - Credit: Archant

The Beach at Great Yarmouth. Picture: Quintin Lake

The Beach at Great Yarmouth. Picture: Quintin Lake - Credit: Archant

Seals at Horsey Gap. Picure: Quintin Lake

Seals at Horsey Gap. Picure: Quintin Lake - Credit: Archant

A sunset at Snettisham. Picture: Quintin Lake

A sunset at Snettisham. Picture: Quintin Lake - Credit: Archant

St. Mary's Church, Burnham Deepdale. Picture: Quintin Lake

St. Mary's Church, Burnham Deepdale. Picture: Quintin Lake - Credit: Archant

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