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Norwich artist exhibits 120 unique paintings he created in just two hours

Artist Brian Korteling with the 120 paintings, laid out on the table, which he painted in 120 minutes, called For What It's Worth. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Artist Brian Korteling with the 120 paintings, laid out on the table, which he painted in 120 minutes, called For What It's Worth. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

Copyright: Archant 2018

For some, art is a leisurely hobby where they while away an afternoon dabbling with paintbrushes.

Artist Brian Korteling with the 120 paintings, laid out on the table, which he painted in 120 minutes, called For What It's Worth. Picture: DENISE BRADLEYArtist Brian Korteling with the 120 paintings, laid out on the table, which he painted in 120 minutes, called For What It's Worth. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

However one Norwich artist has created 120 unique works - in just 120 mins.

Brian Korteling has created them as part of an exhibition at the Nunnsyard Gallery as part of Norfolk and Norwich Open Studios.

Titled For What It’s Worth, he aims to challenge the way art is valued by selling each piece with a different price - from £1 to £120, according to his artistic 
judgment.

He decided to create the works after being asked by audiences how long his works took to paint and how he priced it.

Artist Brian Korteling with the 120 paintings, laid out on the table, which he painted in 120 minutes, called For What It's Worth. Picture: DENISE BRADLEYArtist Brian Korteling with the 120 paintings, laid out on the table, which he painted in 120 minutes, called For What It's Worth. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY

The 42-year-old said: “The value of art is such a beguiling topic for a lot of people and this piece is intended to be a fun way of exploring the subject.

“I often find that I have overworked a piece. One brush stroke too many can destroy the delicate balance of something that you felt was near completion. Time can sometimes kill a painting.”

The works are described as semi-abstract and have been painted with the thought of coastal scenes in mind. Mr Korteling said that the challenges were mostly the preparation, the judging and post production.

He added: “The two hours of painting were only a small percentage of the actual time it will take to carry out.

“From the time spent thinking and planning, to the buying, collecting and preparing the panels, setting up the cameras, to deciding on colours, doing tests, to mixing the paint and cleaning brushes, to finishing and photographing the pieces, to marketing and finally to exhibiting and hopefully selling the work.”

Mr Korteling has lived in Norfolk for most of his life and has been a full-time artist since 2009, after a career in graphic design.

He has had pieces shown in Cley Contemporary 2016 and 2017 and the Waveney Valley Sculpture Trail in 2016, where he won the Judges’ Prize for Waveney Glitch.

For What It’s Worth will be on display from June 2 to 10 at Nunnsyard Gallery, St Augustines Street, Norwich.

It is open from 10am to 3pm on weekdays and between 10am and 5pm on weekends.


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