North Walsham 12-year-old Amy’s charity challenge in memory of ‘Gramps’

Amy Covell outside Victory Swim and Fitness Centre in North Walsham, where she swam 25 miles as part

Amy Covell outside Victory Swim and Fitness Centre in North Walsham, where she swam 25 miles as part of a charity challenge. Picture: JOHN NEWSTEAD - Credit: Archant

Schoolgirl Amy Covell has completed a 50-mile swimming and walking charity challenge in memory of her 'gramps', Michael Wade.

North Walsham schoolgirl Amy Covell's 'Gramps', Michael Wade, who suffered from Lewy body dementia.

North Walsham schoolgirl Amy Covell's 'Gramps', Michael Wade, who suffered from Lewy body dementia. - Credit: Archant

Amy, 12, swam 1,600 lengths - 25 miles - of North Walsham's Victory pool and took part in four walks, totalling a further 25 miles.

The feat was all in aid of fighting Lewy body dementia which had affected her grandfather, Mr Wade, who died in 2014.

The challenge was not the first for Amy, of Birch Close, North Walsham, who has raised nearly £600 with her efforts.

Last year she raised about the same amount for the cause with a cake stall at the Victory Swim and Fitness Centre and by walking nine miles along the Bure Valley Railway, from Wroxham to Aylsham - and another nine miles back again.


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And between challenges Amy paints river stones, adding googly eyes, selling them at a variety of craft events and on her Stones Galore Facebook page.

Amy, a pupil at Aylsham High School, completed her latest challenge between May and the end of August, including the four walks: a 'Colour Run' at Hoveton Hall, a ramble from Holt to Sheringham, the north Norfolk Three Peaks Challenge (Beeston Hill, Incleborough Hill and Stone Hill), and the nine-mile Bure Valley Railway path walk.

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'I'm very proud of her,' said mum, Colleen Covell.

Her stepfather Mr Wade, a retired electrician, suffered from Lewy body dementia as well as Parkinson's in later life.

Amy's fundraising will help research into Lewy bodies, which are tiny protein deposits that kill off nerve cells and brain tissue.

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