Plaque could be made to remember Norfolk’s Singing Postman

Allan Smethurst aka the Singing Postman. submitted by Keith Skipper

Allan Smethurst aka the Singing Postman. submitted by Keith Skipper - Credit: Archant

A community group is looking to have a plaque made to honour Norfolk's Singing Postman.

Allan Smethurst, who died aged 73, was well known in the late 1960s for his Norfolk dialect songs such as Hev Yew Gotta Loight, Boy? and Moind Yer Hid, Boy.

Chris Wright, 53, a member of the Allan Smethurst appreciation society is now calling upon the Sheringham Society to have a plaque made to remember him.

Born in Lincolnshire, the Singing Postman moved with his mother and stepfather to Sheringham, at the age of 11.

After joining the post office in 1953 he began to write amusing songs about rural life, which he sang with a heavy Norfolk accent.

THE COVER OF THE SINGING POSTMAN ALLAN SMETHURST CD 'ROUNDABOUT', WITH CHILDREN FROM STOWMARKET. ES

THE COVER OF THE SINGING POSTMAN ALLAN SMETHURST CD 'ROUNDABOUT', WITH CHILDREN FROM STOWMARKET. ES 10.1.01


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Mr Wright said: "We have been talking about a plaque for a while now, I think it is really important for somebody who grew up in Sheringham and did so much for the town to be remembered.

"He kept the Norfolk dialect alive and I feel that his memory should be kept alive."

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Undated library file picture of Allan Smethurst, The Singing Postman who died aged 73 Thursday Decem

Undated library file picture of Allan Smethurst, The Singing Postman who died aged 73 Thursday December 21, 2000. He had a number of hits in the Sixties including I Miss My Miss from Diss, but his biggest hit was Hev Yew Gotta Loight Boy which won him and Ivor Novellow award in 1966. Mr Smethurst broke his hip in a fall three months ago and his health deteriorated it was reported. See PA Story: SHOWBIZ Postie. PA Photo. - Credit: PA

His success shot him into the spotlight, leading to many television appearances, including Top of the Pops.

At one point in his life, the Singing Postman was outselling the Beatles and the Rolling Stones in Norfolk record shops.

Mr Wright said: "The reaction to our idea has been very positive with many people agreeing that he should be remembered.

Allan Smethurst, the Singing Postman, surrounded by student nurses after he had opened a garden fete

Allan Smethurst, the Singing Postman, surrounded by student nurses after he had opened a garden fete at Hampshire House, the nurses’ home at Cromer this week 50 years ago. - Credit: Archant

"I would like to see the plaque at the place that he lived, on Cliff Road, or on the Sheringham clock tower.

"He sang a lot about the Wymondham Arms, the Robin Hood and the prom, so it could also be in one of those places."

By the late 1960s, Mr Smethurst's career had come to an end and arthritis made playing the guitar difficult.

He died in Grimsby in 2000 aged 73, having spent the last 20 years of his life in the town's Salvation Army Hostel.

Allan Smethurst - the Singing Postman. Edp file pic form 1975.

Allan Smethurst - the Singing Postman. Edp file pic form 1975.

Mr Wright has approached the Sheringham Society to ask about the plaque and they will discuss the matter at the next meeting.

Norfolk's Singing Postman Allen Smethurst, pictured at a 1967 Yarmouth gig. Picture: ARCHANT

Norfolk's Singing Postman Allen Smethurst, pictured at a 1967 Yarmouth gig. Picture: ARCHANT - Credit: Archant

Allan Smethurst - the Singing Postman. Edp file pic.

Allan Smethurst - the Singing Postman. Edp file pic. - Credit: Archant

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