Norfolk’s longest boardwalk unveiled at spectacular Burgh Castle fort site making the ‘hidden gem’ easier to explore

A new 700m boardwalk has been officially opened at Burgh Castle. Pictured is Martin Wilby, chairman

A new 700m boardwalk has been officially opened at Burgh Castle. Pictured is Martin Wilby, chairman of Norfolk County Council's environment, development and transport committee. Photo: Nick Butcher - Credit: Archant

A haven for history and wildlife, Burgh Castle fort's tranquil setting has long been a magnet for dog walkers and nature lovers.

A new 700m boardwalk has been officially opened at Burgh Castle. Pictured is Martin Wilby, chairman

A new 700m boardwalk has been officially opened at Burgh Castle. Pictured is Martin Wilby, chairman of Norfolk County Council's environment, development and transport committee. Photo: Nick Butcher - Credit: Archant

But its muddy banks have meant pathways were often flooded and impassable, scoured by storm surges and difficult to negotiate.

Now one of Norfolk's hidden gems is easier to discover thanks to a new 700m boardwalk - the longest in the county.

Having taken three months to install the raised walkway means everyone can enjoy the idyllic scene on the reed-ringed fringes of the Waveney River.

And among those trying it out on the day of its official launch near Great Yarmouth were four Active Trails members.


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The wheelchair users, some of them in all-terrain, chain-operated models, were involved in the original audit.

Among them was Ally Clarke, the group's vice chairman, who was visiting the waterside Roman fort for the first time.

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He hailed the new £53,000 boardwalk as a real asset to the site which meant, importantly, that families could enjoy time out together.

Meanwhile Moira Selvage, from Lound, who was out walking with her friend Elizabeth Burt, of Bradwell, said it was 'absolutely brilliant' adding: 'It is wonderfully wide and we do not have to fight through the nettles.'

Martin Caplin, assistant trails officer at Norfolk County Council, said building the timber path was a logistical challenge on a protected site where every stone had to be officially recorded.

Specialist 'post puncher' machinery had to be bought in due to the restricted area they had to work in.

The 700m stretch is part of Angles Way Norfolk Trail and the walk makes it circular, adding to its appeal, and includes two viewing spots taking in an impressive vista spanning Haddiscoe, Reedham, Cantley, Berney Arms and Stokesby.

Martin Wilby, chairman of the county council's environment, development and transport committee, was delighted to see so many people out and about and enjoying the site, its Roman history, wildlife and landscape.

'The best thing is that it is accessible to all,' he said. 'There are no barriers to anybody. The whole site is really something special.'

The timbers have a life of at least 15 years. It is the third such project to be completed this year.

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