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Emu among animals killed on Norfolk's roads, figures reveal

PUBLISHED: 13:39 08 April 2019 | UPDATED: 16:55 08 April 2019

An emu at Banham Zoo.

An emu at Banham Zoo.

A small emu was among the animals killed on Norfolk’s roads over the last three years - but numbers reveal the animal most likely to end up as roadkill was deer.

Norfolk roadkill statistics reveal the animal most likely to die on the county's roads is the deer.Norfolk roadkill statistics reveal the animal most likely to die on the county's roads is the deer.

Data indicate that the most dangerous of the A roads for animals in the county is the A14 while the least dangerous is the A47.

In 2018, on the A47, seven animals, including three deer and one horse were found, while 24 animals including 13 deer, four dogs, one badger, one cat and five unknown were discovered on the A14.

Over the last four years between 50 and 60 animals have been killed annually on roads in Great Yarmouth borough.

Most of those animals were cats, at 106.

Norfolk roadkill statistics reveal the animal most likely to die on the county's roads is the deer.Norfolk roadkill statistics reveal the animal most likely to die on the county's roads is the deer.

In the Broadland District Council area, as in other parts of the county, the animals which suffered most were deer and cats.

A message to the council’s website on January 12, 2017, said: “Dead rhea (small emu) in Broadland owned wood at side of Mileplain plantation.”

In South Norfolk the main victims were deer, with 179 killed since 2015, while over the same period 48 cats were killed.

Norwich City Council does not gather data on roadkill.

Norfolk and Suffolk Police send out a Humane Animal Dispatch (HAD) officer to deal with animals on the road that are injured but not yet dead.

The officers were called 40 times in 2016, 69 times in 2017 and on 53 occasions last year.

The police also sent armed response vehicles to dispatch an animal 65 times in 2016, 48 times in 2017 and 49 times last year.

Motorists who notice an animal carcass obstructing a road can send a message to Norfolk County Council.

One sent from Holverston on March 28, 2017 said: “There are about 7/8 animals on the A146 into Norwich from Beccles. 4/5 large deer, a fox, pheasant and other unidentifiable animals.

“Who is responsible for removing them? They make me feel ill every single day on my commute into Norwich, slowly decomposing.”

On April 10, 2017 a message sent from Loddon said: “There are several large animals on the A146 from Beccles to Thurton. Several deer, rabbits, pheasants and lots of animals that are now just masses of blood and guts in the road. It’s grim. There are a number of whole animals. Why aren’t these sorted out sooner? It’s incredibly off-putting.”

Highways England said: “Animal carcasses are only removed from the A roads when they are likely to cause a safety concern and primarily where they are causing an obstruction in a live lane.

“We will routinely remove the carcasses of cats and dogs with the aim of returning them to their owners if they can be traced through microchip records.”

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