Norfolk lavender in full flower at Heacham

Taz Ali in a beautiful field of Norfolk Lavender at Heacham. Picture: Ian Burt

Taz Ali in a beautiful field of Norfolk Lavender at Heacham. Picture: Ian Burt - Credit: Ian Burt

Up on the coast, there's a scent of the Mediterranean in the air.

Taz Ali in a beautiful field of Norfolk Lavender at Heacham. Picture: Ian Burt

Taz Ali in a beautiful field of Norfolk Lavender at Heacham. Picture: Ian Burt - Credit: Ian Burt

Lavender is in full flower at Heacham, where Norfolk Lavender has been growing the iconic herb for almost a century.

Legend has it the plant was brought to our shores by the Romans, who established several outposts in north Norfolk.

Taz Ali in a beautiful field of Norfolk Lavender at Heacham. Picture: Ian Burt

Taz Ali in a beautiful field of Norfolk Lavender at Heacham. Picture: Ian Burt - Credit: Ian Burt

Soldiers carried first aid kits of herbal remedies and herbs were planted where legions set up camp.

In Medieval and Tudor times, lavender was valued for everything from cleaning teeth to sweetening the air with its scent.

Taz Ali in a beautiful field of Norfolk Lavender at Heacham. Picture: Ian Burt

Taz Ali in a beautiful field of Norfolk Lavender at Heacham. Picture: Ian Burt - Credit: Ian Burt


You may also want to watch:


It became feashionable as a perfume by Victorian times, while during the First World War it supplemented supplies of antiseptics.

After the war, lavender fields around London were ploughed yup for development.

Norfolk Lavender at Heacham. Picture: Ian Burt

Norfolk Lavender at Heacham. Picture: Ian Burt - Credit: Ian Burt

Most Read

Lavender came to Heacham in 1932, when three men and a boy planted six acres. It's been harvested every summer since.

Norfolk Lavender, on the A149 coast road, now houses the national collection of more than 100 species of the plant.

Norfolk Lavender at Heacham. Picture: Ian Burt

Norfolk Lavender at Heacham. Picture: Ian Burt - Credit: Ian Burt

It also has around 100 acres under cultivation. Oil from the flowers is distilled to make cosmetics and other fragrant products.

Norfolk Lavender at Heacham. Picture: Ian Burt

Norfolk Lavender at Heacham. Picture: Ian Burt - Credit: Ian Burt

A bee buzzing around the Norfolk Lavender at Heacham. Picture: Ian Burt

A bee buzzing around the Norfolk Lavender at Heacham. Picture: Ian Burt - Credit: Ian Burt

Norfolk Lavender at Heacham. Picture: Ian Burt

Norfolk Lavender at Heacham. Picture: Ian Burt - Credit: Ian Burt

Norfolk Lavender at Heacham. Picture: Ian Burt

Norfolk Lavender at Heacham. Picture: Ian Burt - Credit: Ian Burt

A butterfly rests on Norfolk Lavender at Heacham. Picture: Ian Burt

A butterfly rests on Norfolk Lavender at Heacham. Picture: Ian Burt - Credit: Ian Burt

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter