New tool from the Forestry Commission will help walkers in Thetford Forest identify and learn about trees

Thetford Forest. Picture: Sonya Duncan

Thetford Forest. Picture: Sonya Duncan - Credit: Eastern Daily Press � 2015

A new online identification tool has been launched to help those who love walking in Thetford Forest discover what trees they are seeing.

Santon Downham in Thetford Forest. Picture: Sonya Duncan

Santon Downham in Thetford Forest. Picture: Sonya Duncan - Credit: Eastern Daily Press � 2015

Tree Explorer, from the Forestry Commission, helps people to identify and learn more about the different tree species and uncover some amazing facts in the process.

Visitors can identify trees using leaves, bark and seeds and also delve into some of the entertaining old tree traditions.

Lynford Arboretum in the Spring. Picture: Sonya Duncan

Lynford Arboretum in the Spring. Picture: Sonya Duncan - Credit: Eastern Daily Press � 2013


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Self-guided walks have also been created at Lynford Arboretum and St Helen's, between Thetford and Brandon, to encourage people to learn more about the trees on their doorstep.

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A Tree Explorer activity pack for children is also available to download.

Rachel Giles, from the Forestry Commission, said: 'We hope our new campaign will inspire everyone to discover more about the wonderful world of trees.'

Tree facts

Oak trees don't start producing acorns until they are 40-years-old and reach peak production when they are 80-120 years old.

Scots pine can live up to 8.5 times longer than the average person in the UK, to the ripe old age of 700.

Romans used to grind sweet chestnuts for their baking. Their leaves have been used to treat whooping cough and rheumatism and stiffness in joints and muscles.

A joint made of ash is said to be able to bear more weight than any type of wood. It's a great source of firewood too, with its name deriving from the word 'firelight'.

Trees reduce the impact of climate change by absorbing carbon dioxide and storing the carbon in their wood.

For more information click about Tree Explorer click here

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