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New map shows Norwich as you've never seen it before

PUBLISHED: 10:36 18 July 2019 | UPDATED: 10:36 18 July 2019

Professor Matthew Woodcock, professor of medieval and early modern literature at the University of East Anglia, at Norwich market with the Discover Festive Tudor and Stuart Norwich Civic Entertainments trail map. Picture: SOPHIE WYLLIE

Professor Matthew Woodcock, professor of medieval and early modern literature at the University of East Anglia, at Norwich market with the Discover Festive Tudor and Stuart Norwich Civic Entertainments trail map. Picture: SOPHIE WYLLIE

SOPHIE WYLLIE

It was known as England's second city in the Tudor period.

And now visitors and residents can learn about Norwich's rich cultural past from that period thanks to a free walking guide.

The map was created by professor Matthew Woodcock, who lectures in medieval and early modern literature at the University of East Anglia.

It highlights 16 city centre locations which promoted entertainment of all forms from 1540 to 1642.

These included inns, open spaces and landmark buildings which hosted travelling theatre companies and musicians, sport, civic celebrations, judicial punishments and even a visit from Queen Elizabeth I.

Prof Woodcock, 46, from Carrow Road in Norwich, said: "There is a real appetite for local history in Norwich. There is a sense of civic pride."

The academic, who was born and grew up in the city, added: "The fundamental aim is to offer the residents and visitors of Norwich a renewed appreciation of its history."

He described Norwich as an important cultural centre during the Tudor and Stuart period.

So much so, it hosted Queen Elizabeth I for a week in August 1578.

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During that time the monarch enjoyed plays and music.

Major historical landmarks which feature in the trail include St Andrew's Hall, the 15th-century Guildhall and the market.

But lesser-known venues which are no longer present, including the former Red Lion Inn on Red Lion Street are also featured on the route.

"Norwich was an important destination for travelling theatre companies in the 17th century," said prof Woodcock.

The history of accepting refugees into the city, including the Dutch and Flemish strangers in the 16th century is also reflected.

The research took two years and involved looking through hundreds of archive documents.

It was funded by £250,000 from the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

Prof Woodcock said: "It was a long but incredible process."

Some 1,500 maps for the Discover Festive Tudor and Stuart Norwich Civic Entertainments trail have been printed and are available from Norwich's Tourist Information Centre.

They will also be available from city centre hosts and museums.



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