New book recalls Stalham’s railway glory days

Stalham Railway Station pictured in about 1950. Picture: SUBMITTED

Stalham Railway Station pictured in about 1950. Picture: SUBMITTED - Credit: Archant

Thousands once flocked to Stalham to enjoy a holiday on the Broads, packing trains from the Midlands.

Celebrations in front of Stalham Station to mark the coronation of King Edward VII on January 22 190

Celebrations in front of Stalham Station to mark the coronation of King Edward VII on January 22 1901. The men in the horse-drawn vehicle are members of the town's fire brigade. The station building was dismantled in 2004 and rebuilt at Holt Station. Picture: SUBMITTED - Credit: Archant

And Stalham Station was also busy with good trains, taking local produce to markets in London and York and transporting cattle.

But the town's railway era ended 57 years ago this week when the station was closed.

Ray Woolston believes most of his fellow Stalham residents are unaware of the town's railway heritage and he has produced a book to record the glory days, before memories are lost forever.

Called Stalham's Forgotten Railway, the 52-page book includes about four dozen photos.

Passengers on the Melton Constable platform at Stalham Station, pictured in the early 1900s. Picture

Passengers on the Melton Constable platform at Stalham Station, pictured in the early 1900s. Picture: SUBMITTED - Credit: Archant


You may also want to watch:


'If you went to Stalham High Street and asked 50 people, very few could tell you anything about the railway station,' said Mr Woolston, 62, of St Mary's Road.

'All that's left now is a small piece of land that's been sold for redevelopment.

Most Read

'In 2004 the station building was dismantled, brick by brick, and rebuilt at Holt Station.'

The track disappeared under the A149 by-pass in the 1960s, with some now forming part of the Weaver's Way footpath.

Opened on July 3 1880, Stalham Station provided a link between Great Yarmouth and Melton Constable, with links to Norwich, London, and the Midlands.

It was a very busy line and as many as 84 trains ran daily, pulling up to 16 coaches.

Mr Woolston's book catalogues the businesses which used the line, the characters associated with it, and peppers the story with the odd anecdote.

Stalham's Forgotten Railway will be available from next week and costs £7.95 from the Poppy Centre Shop and Forrester's newsagents, both on Stalham High Street, or from Mr Woolston: raywoolston@hotmail.com

At least £1 from sales will go towards the Poppy Centre appeal, to help finish the new building on Stalham Recreation Ground for use by youth and other community groups.

Are you involved in a heritage project? Contact alex.hurrell@archant.co.uk

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter
Comments powered by Disqus