Mystery over stuck turbine

Gulliver, Lowestoft's landmark wind turbine, remained at a standstill last night- more than two weeks after its blades stopped turning. And operators Triodos said they were unable to say exactly when it would be working again and resume production of electricity for the National Grid.

Gulliver, Lowestoft's landmark wind turbine, remained at a standstill last night- more than two weeks after its blades stopped turning.

And operators Triodos said they were unable to say exactly when it would be working again and resume production of electricity for the National Grid.

Matthew Clayton, investment manager for Triodos' renewable energy fund, said the company was frustrated by the problems causing it to be idle.

He could not say when the blades of the 410ft turbine at Ness Point would be turning again, though engineers were there on Wednesday evening working on it.

“It is an ongoing electrical and computer issue,” he said. “We have engineers coming in from Denmark, and components from there, and it is all taking time to resolve.

“We want to get it running again as soon as possible - a turbine operating is much better for everyone concerned.”

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Mr Clayton said the company was not covered by insurance for all the lost production of electricity.

Installed at Ness Point last year by Lowestoft-based SLP Energy, Gulliver was the tallest turbine in the country, capable of generating enough power for 1,600 homes.

A few months after Gulliver began operating, it was acquired by Triodos which launched a share issue aimed at bringing in £5 million to back its renewable energy enterprise.

Gulliver was a flagship for a move by SLP into the burgeoning renewable energy business and the company is now involved in the installation of other windfarms. It is about to submit a formal plan to build three windfarms near Barrow in Cumbria.