Mystery of stolen Norwich painting is solved

Gemma Correll's painting has been reinstated in the St Stephen’s Underpass in Norwich. Picture Ruth

Gemma Correll's painting has been reinstated in the St Stephens Underpass in Norwich. Picture Ruth Knapp - Credit: Ruth Knapp

A painting which was mysteriously stolen from the St Stephen's Underpass in Norwich last year has been found.

Gemma Correll's painting has been reinstated in the St Stephen’s Underpass in Norwich. Picture Ruth

Gemma Correll's painting has been reinstated in the St Stephens Underpass in Norwich. Picture Ruth Knapp - Credit: Ruth Knapp

The painting, which was taken in September, is part of the Underground Gallery which has been part of the city's art scene since 2015 and contains giant colourful boards which were installed to brighten up the area.

It was created by Gemma Correll, a former Norwich University of the Arts student, who is famous for her 'Pugs Not Drugs' designs.

The last sighting of the piece of art was in the grounds of the former Norfolk and Norwich Hospital and Ruth Knapp from Life in a Fine City, the team behind the project, said it was recovered very close by.

MORE: Have you seen this painting? It has been stolen from the St Stephen's Underpass gallery in Norwich

The painting was by Gemma Correll. Picture Archant Library.

The painting was by Gemma Correll. Picture Archant Library. - Credit: Archant Norfolk

'It was found just around the corner from the old hospital and someone had ended up putting it in their garden,' she said. 'Someone got in contact and said they had it.


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'We are not pointing any fingers, we are just happy to have it back.'

The painting was reinstated in the gallery last week despite slight damaged to it from being outside for more than four months.

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Street artists, illustrators and painters, from ages 16 to 60, teamed up with the blog Life in a Fine City, Moosey Art and Norwich City Council to improve the subway with the gallery opening in the summer of 2015.

The gallery features a wide range of designs including one remembering Sergiusz Meges, a rough sleeper who died in the underpass. The board was painted by Devin Smith, an artist who aims to encourage people to notice those not usually acknowledged by society.

Ms Knapp added: 'We are hoping to add some more paintings to the underpass very soon as it is such a dreary place and they really do help to brighten it up.'

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