Museum keeping Second World War US Bomb Group’s history in Seething alive

Seething USAAF WWII control tower open day. Station 146 Tower Association chairman Geoff Jenkinson (

Seething USAAF WWII control tower open day. Station 146 Tower Association chairman Geoff Jenkinson (centre), with his daughter and treasurer Linda Milburn and public relations officer John McCormack. Picture : ANTONY KELLY - Credit: copyright ARCHANT 2017

A museum commemorating a Second World War US bomb group this month celebrates its 30th anniversary.

Seething USAAF WWII control tower open day. Station 146 Tower Association chairman Geoff Jenkinson (

Seething USAAF WWII control tower open day. Station 146 Tower Association chairman Geoff Jenkinson (centre), with his daughter and treasurer Linda Milburn and public relations officer John McCormack. Picture : ANTONY KELLY - Credit: copyright ARCHANT 2017

Seething Control Tower Museum opened in 1987 as a way to remember US soldiers who were based in the village during the Second World War.

The airfield next to the control tower was the home of the 448th Bomb Group of the United States Air Force between November 1943 and April 1945.

During that time they flew 262 missions and around 500 men from the group died.

Jim Turner was a child living in the village when the group first arrived.

Seething USAAF WWII control tower open day. Station 146 Tower Association chairman Geoff Jenkinson (

Seething USAAF WWII control tower open day. Station 146 Tower Association chairman Geoff Jenkinson (centre), with his daughter and treasurer Linda Milburn and public relations officer John McCormack. Picture : ANTONY KELLY - Credit: copyright ARCHANT 2017


You may also want to watch:


Around 40 years later he got involved with the process of opening the control tower to be used as a public museum.

Now he works as the membership secretary of the Station 146 Tower Association.

Most Read

He said: 'I remember being a 12-year-old schoolboy when they arrived so I saw what went on and for that age it was quite exciting.

'We had never seen an American other than on the cinema screen back then so we all wondered what they were going to be like.

Seething USAAF WWII control tower open day. Station 146 Tower Association chairman Geoff Jenkinson (

Seething USAAF WWII control tower open day. Station 146 Tower Association chairman Geoff Jenkinson (centre), with his daughter and treasurer Linda Milburn and public relations officer John McCormack. Picture : ANTONY KELLY - Credit: copyright ARCHANT 2017

'Eventually we got to know them, we made friends and they just become regular people in the area.'

In 1959 the land was sold back to farmers but two years later Waveney Fly Group (WFG) purchased part of the airfield.

Two decades later, work started on the derelict control tower with a small gang from WFG and the village giving their time and labour, and money sent over by members of 448th BG Association.

The tower was reopened with a large party including 448th veterans and families in 1987.

Mr Turner who was involved with the project said: 'We all wanted to keep the history of the tower alive.

'I am proud to see that it has been open now 30 years, and families and just people who are interested visit the museum.'

The museum holds large displays of memorabilia, equipment, photographs and personal stories from the 448th veterans.

The Tower is open on the first Sunday of every month up until October.

For more visit www.seethingtower.org

Become a Supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Become a Supporter