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Models of King's Lynn's built heritage go on display at True's Yard

PUBLISHED: 13:52 07 June 2013 | UPDATED: 13:52 07 June 2013

Fred Hall and his historic models of King's Lynn, which are on show at the True's Yard Museum in a special exhibition. Picture: Matthew Usher.

Fred Hall and his historic models of King's Lynn, which are on show at the True's Yard Museum in a special exhibition. Picture: Matthew Usher.

© Archant Norfolk 2013

Incredible scale models detailing King's Lynn's built heritage have gone on show in a special exhibition in the town's old North End.

Ten pieces by Frederick Hall form part of a special display at True’s Yard, on the corner of St Anne’s Street and North Street.

They include meticulously-reaserched scale models of long-lost parts of Lynn, along with individual buildings such as St Nicholas Chapel, Lynn Minster and The Exchange, which was the forerunner of the Custom House.

Mr Wood, a retired carpenter from West Winch, said each model had taken him upwards of 500 hours to complete.

He said he became interested in heritage after his wife prtricia died 14 years ago.

“In 2007, Dr Paul Richards asked me to do the old North End fishing area and from there I got an obsession and started to create them.”

In Mr Hall’s replica of the old fishing quarter, tiny washing flutters on lines over the long-lost yards around North Street and Pilot Street.

While the tiny cottages have long been demolished, some familiar buildings can be seen - including True’s Yard and St Nicholas Chapel.

Individual buildings - built to a scale of 1/4inch to the foot - include Lynn Minster, formerly St Margaret’s Church, when it had both a spire on one of its twin towers to rival that of St Nicholas and a lantern akin to a smaller version of Ely Cathedral.

When the Custom House was built in the 1680s, its ground floor beside the Purfleet was open to the elements. While it has since been enclosed, the building retained its unique character.

“I’m just bowled over, I really am,” said West Norfolk Mayor Liz Watson as she performed the official opening yesterday. “It’s wonderful. It puts it all into context, you can picture it as it was. They’re fantastic models.”

The models are on display at True’s Yard until August. The museum is open Tuesdays - Saturdays, 10am - 4pm. Admission is £3 (adult), £2.50 (conc), £1 (child).

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