Mental health poll reveals high levels of suicidal thoughts among 999 staff

For the East of England respondents, 21pc had contemplated suicide, lower than the national average,

For the East of England respondents, 21pc had contemplated suicide, lower than the national average, and 68pc had considered leaving their role, almost double the national average. - Credit: Archant

A national survey has revealed the high incidence of suicidal thoughts among emergency service workers.

The online study was commissioned by mental health charity Mind, and was completed by more than 1,600 staff and volunteers from police, fire, ambulance and search and rescue services in England and Wales, including 47 people from the East of England

More than one in four people polled had contemplated taking their own life due to stress and poor mental health while working for the emergency services, while nearly two thirds had contemplated leaving their job or voluntary role because of stress or poor mental health.

For the East of England respondents, 21pc had contemplated suicide, lower than the national average, and 68pc had considered leaving their role, almost double the national average.

Faye McGuinness, Blue Light programme manager for Mind, said the findings were 'shocking'.


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She added that the challenging nature of the job meant it was important that support was made available.

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