Man wants killer brother to 'rot in hell

IAN CLARKE A distraught son yesterday said he wanted his brother to “rot in hell” for brutally killing their “wonderful” parents. In an exclusive and emotional interview with the EDP, Nicholas Dunkley backed calls for a wide-ranging inquiry into the circumstances surrounding the deaths of Arthur, 83, and Marguerite Dunkley, 80, at the hands of their schizophrenic son Terrence.

IAN CLARKE

A distraught son said yesterday he wanted his brother to "rot in hell" for killing their parents.

In an exclusive interview with the EDP, Nicholas Dunkley backed calls for a wide-ranging inquiry into the circumstances surrounding the deaths of Arthur, 83, and Marguerite Dunkley, 80, at the hands of their schizophrenic son Terrence.

Nicholas and his relatives want to know why two psychiatrists said for several months that Dunkley, 54, could stand trial for the murders of the couple at their home at Lyng, near Dereham, in June, 2005 but changed their minds just before the case started last week.

Nicholas, 44, who lives on the edge of Norwich, said he had been kept in the dark about reasons for the rethink.

"Because of the change, it opens a whole can of worms about why on two previous occasions we were told there was nothing wrong with him," said Nicholas, referring to two incidents of violence by his brother against their parents.

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Nicholas also told how his mother had pleaded with him not to confront Dunkley about the abuse, and of how she had ignored Nicholas's plea for to her to press charges.

Choking back tears, Nicholas said: "I want him to rot in hell. I want him to wake up every day and realise what he has done. I was instructed by my mother not to confront him. I had been out of the country when it happened on both occasions and I was concerned what he had done, but I always wanted to please my mother. Obviously I never thought it would go this far, and we are constantly questioning about what things could have been done."

On Friday, a jury at Norwich Crown Court decided Dunkley, who lived at Tottenhill, near King's Lynn, had stamped the couple to death before piling furniture on them.

Dunkley, deemed unfit to stand trial for murder, was detained indefinitely at the Norvic Clinic in Norwich under the Mental Health Act.

Mental health campaigners want answers, and internal, independent inquiries are expected to be held.

Nicholas said that, despite impressions of a long history of abuse, his brother had only twice used violence against their parents.

In 2003, Dunkley pushed his mother down the stairs, then he attacked them both about four months before he killed them. Police were called on both occasions and Dunkley was referred to specialist units, but Nicholas said they claimed there was "nothing wrong with him". He added: "I am not saying he was or wasn't mentally ill; I am not a psychiatrist. But an inquiry needs to look at all aspects."

Nicholas, who works in trust management at the Norfolk and Norwich University Hospital, said: "My parents were wonderful people, and anyone who came into contact with them was greatly impressed by both of them.

"They did not deserve this, and they would do anything for anyone and nothing was too much trouble - and that was part of the problem. They kept on working on my brother, believing that he was worth persevering with. They decided to give him one last chance."

He added: "We fully agree with and support the call for a full inquiry, and it is definitely something which needs to happen. It needs to be more than an internal inquiry and must be wide-ranging

and possibly an outside, independent one."

Nicholas said the police had done all they could. "If only she (their mother) had pressed charges. But she was quite angry at the suggestion of doing so," he said.

Nicholas said his brother was extremely jealous of what his parents had achieved.

He said the deaths had had an unimaginable and contin-uing impact on himself, his brother Christopher, who lives in Australia, and Mrs Dunkley's sister and her family. "We have no closure, and we have to grapple with differing things about trying to move on. All we want is justice for them," he said.