Norfolk man creates his own Hawaiian haven in his back garden

Phil built a tiki bar in his garden during lockdown.

Phil built a tiki bar in his garden during lockdown. - Credit: Brittany Woodman/ Archant

A Norfolk man who missed going away during lockdown decided to bring the holiday buzz to his garden - and it doesn't even require a passport.

Phil Parry, who lives in Newton Flotman with his partner and two young children, built a tiki bar himself during a week off work as a lockdown project in May 2021.

The 43-year-old, who works for Aviva, said he wanted people who visited to feel like they had been "transported to another place".

Phil Parry said he wanted people who visited to feel like they had been transported to another place.

Phil Parry said he wanted people who visited to feel like they had been transported to another place. - Credit: Brittany Woodman/ Archant

He said: "We've tried to bring the holiday vibes to our back garden with a tropical feel to it. 

"We couldn't be happier with how it's turned out."

The build of the tiki bar took just seven days to complete.

The build of the tiki bar took just seven days to complete. - Credit: Supplied

Mr Parry built the bar from scratch using materials sourced from DIY stores and bought tiki-based trinkets found at car boot sales from places as diverse as Great Yarmouth to Tenerife. 

Coined 'The Norfolk Tiki Bar', Mr Parry said people have praised the bar and tropical surroundings - adding that it has "completely transported them to sunnier, palm-laden climes".

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And his love of going abroad stems from when Mr Parry met his partner while they were both working overseas in Majorca.

He said: "We met in 2003 while we working as reps and we love going away so we thought 'let's bring holidays to the garden'. 

"We're looking forward to the summer so people can come round and enjoy it properly."

Mr Parry built the bar from scratch using materials sourced from DIY stores.

Mr Parry built the bar from scratch using materials sourced from DIY stores and bought tiki-based trinkets found at car boot sales from places as diverse as Great Yarmouth to Tenerife. - Credit: Brittany Woodman/ Archant

The project cost Mr Parry "a few thousand pounds" but he added that it was worth it.

He said: "It didn't make any sense to get it built because of the cost. You might as well create it to your own specifications.

One of the trinkets in Mr Parry's garden.

One of the trinkets in Mr Parry's garden. - Credit: Brittany Woodman/ Archant

"The wood itself cost about £1,000 and we wanted to deck it out with trinkets like tiki masks and other unique things we've spotted.

"We've spent a few thousand in total but we love it."

Phil Parry and son Zackary enjoying a drink in the tiki bar.

Phil Parry and son Zackary enjoying a drink in the tiki bar. - Credit: Brittany Woodman/ Archant

And not even the recent storms could put a damper on his project.

He said: "I'm really surprised because something I built withstood three storms in a row.

"Everything managed to stay in tact. I'm quite proud of my DIY skills."

What is a tiki bar?

A tiki bar is a themed drinking place which tends to serve extravagant cocktails.

Tiki bars are described as entering a world of escapism and almost a step into another world.

With history which stretches back to the 1930s, tiki bars often serve a wide variety of exotic rum-based mixed drinks such as the Mai Tai and Zombie cocktails.

Tiki bars are renowned for its specialty drinks, some of which may be unique to a bar and the recipes which are often carefully protected from competitors trying to replicate drinks.

But home tiki bars are also becoming increasingly popular as they often serve multi-purposes such as creating a space to relax as well as a place to show off tiki collections of mugs, art and other items of interest.