‘The best thing is talking’ - Bereaved brother encourages others to seek help

Luke Wright, 24, from Norwich died on November 10 2019. Picture: Wright Family

Luke Wright, 24, from Norwich died on November 10 2019. Picture: Wright Family - Credit: Archant

The brother of an ambulance worker who has died is encouraging other men to seek help and not to be afraid to open up if they are struggling with their mental health.

Luke Wright, 24, from Norwich died on November 10 2019. Picture: Wright Family

Luke Wright, 24, from Norwich died on November 10 2019. Picture: Wright Family - Credit: Archant

Luke Wright, 24, who worked for the East of England Ambulance Service (EEAS) in Norwich, died on Sunday, November 10.

He is one of three members of the EEAS who have died in the past two weeks.

Following the deaths EEAS staff are being offered support.Paying tribute to Mr Wright, his younger brother Daniel, who also works for EEAS, said Luke had a bright and bubbly personality and could make anyone smile.

He said: "[Luke] was a brilliant Dad, he loved his little girl to bits, he'd never be without her.

"As soon as he entered a room he'd make himself known, he'd always have a laugh, he had a great sense of humour, he was brilliant."


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Mr Wright said his brother's eagerness to help others made him extremely good at his job and that he was well respected by his colleagues: "Everyone has been so supportive within the ambulance service, they've all sent messages and cards, they all loved him in the control room."

Luke is believed to have taken his own life, and now his brother is encouraging people, especially men, not to be afraid to seek help if they are struggling with their mental health.

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Referencing the slogan 'it's okay not to be okay', Mr Wright said: "I've suffered personally and still do with mental health issues but me and Luke were different people, Luke was very closed and didn't feel that he should open up but something needs to change, people need to feel they can open up and not be afraid to.

"The best thing is talking and that's always seen as the hardest step but taking it then opens up so many doors for so much support.

"[Talking] shows your vulnerabilities but then you come out stronger because you're going to feel a lot better for talking about how you're are feeling."

Following Mr Wright's death a JustGiving page has been set up to raise money for his funeral.

The page can be found at www.justgiving.com/crowdfunding/lukewrightFor help and support visit www.norfolkandwaveneymind.org.uk. Alternatively call the Samaritans' 24/7 free helpline on 116123 or visit www.samaritans.org

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