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Anger after rubble and fridge dumped in alleyway behind homes

PUBLISHED: 06:00 19 August 2020 | UPDATED: 17:19 19 August 2020

A mound of waste has been fly-tipped behind homes in Tonning Street and Bevan Street West in Lowestoft. PHOTO: Georgia Talia

A mound of waste has been fly-tipped behind homes in Tonning Street and Bevan Street West in Lowestoft. PHOTO: Georgia Talia

Archant

Rubble, a fridge and a shopping trolley are among a mound of waste which has been dumped in an alley behind terraced homes.

A mound of waste has been fly-tipped behind homes in Tonning Street and Bevan Street West in Lowestoft. PHOTO: Georgia TaliaA mound of waste has been fly-tipped behind homes in Tonning Street and Bevan Street West in Lowestoft. PHOTO: Georgia Talia

Large items, including a fridge and mattress, as well as large pieces of rubble, sleeping bags, lampshades and garden waste, have all built up in recent weeks in the alleyway between homes on Tonning Street and Bevan Street West in Lowestoft.

Georgia Talia, a resident of Tonning Street, said East Suffolk Council were unable to help for free with the alleyway being private land.

The 23-year-old sales consultant said: “I have been noticing it for the last couple of months, slowly building up with people dumping things.

“It was small things at first, bits and bobs, then trollies and fridges, now it looks like someone has dug up their patio and dumped that too.

“I have lived here for a year now and this is the first time I’ve noticed a problem with fly-tipping here.

“It is just a bit annoying because I can’t get my bike out.”

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“The council have refused to remove any of it because it is a private alleyway that doesn’t lead anywhere, so they have asked us to pay for it.

“I think it’s a bit rubbish to ask us to pay for someone else’s actions.”

A spokesperson for East Suffolk Council said: “We will investigate all incidents of fly-tipping, whether they are on public or private land, and we will seek to prosecute offenders based on any evidence we can gather.

“However, we are only able to clear any waste, free of charge, if it is on public land.

“In this particular case, the tip is not of public land, but we are currently looking into the possibility of securing a community grant that would enable us to clear the waste on this particular occasion.”

After a brief suspension during the coronavirus lockdown, East Suffolk Council resumed bulky waste collections in the district in May.

The council advises those who discover fly-tipped waste not to touch it as it may include syringes, broken glass, asbestos, toxic chemicals or other hazardous substances.

Those who see someone fly-tipping are urged to take not of the date and time; how many people there were, including descriptions; what was fly-tipped; and any vehicles involved.


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