Lowestoft school celebrates strong links with India

Students from Benjamin Britten High School in Lowestoft who are part of the Connecting Classrooms pr

Students from Benjamin Britten High School in Lowestoft who are part of the Connecting Classrooms project – a UK government and British Council education initiative. The schools have been selected in recognition of their commitment to teaching students about global issues. - Credit: Archant

A pioneering partnership between a Lowestoft high school and students in India looks set to flourish in the future.

Indian students who are part of the Connecting Classrooms project – a UK government and British Coun

Indian students who are part of the Connecting Classrooms project – a UK government and British Council education initiative. The schools have been selected in recognition of their commitment to teaching students about global issues. - Credit: Archant

Back in 2011, the head teacher of Benjamin Britten High School, Andrew Hine, made a successful visit to the Hamirpur region of northern India.

As the head of one of Britain's most easterly high schools, Mr Hine looked further east to Asia to foster special links. And now this link-up took a major step forward this week as staff and students at the school in Blyford Road were celebrating along with pupils and staff in Hamirpur.

For they have been chosen to develop international links as part of a major new school twinning project to boost global education.

The association comes through Connecting Classrooms – a UK government and British Council education initiative. The schools have been selected in recognition of their commitment to teaching students about global issues.


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Teachers and students are working to learn how to become responsible global citizens and to develop skills to work in a global economy. Schools across the UK can benefit from a range of support offered by the scheme.

This new collaboration stems from the success of the private visit two years ago, which saw Mr Hine attend Him Academy Public School, in the Himalayan foothills.

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And now the schools intend to work together so their students can explore issues such as recycling, solar power and energy as well as a better understanding of daily life for pupils in the other school.

Secretary of state for international development, Justine Greening, said: 'I am very pleased that Benjamin Britten High School in Lowestoft is taking on this excellent opportunity to link with schools in other parts of our world.

'Young people and teachers can make a fantastic contribution by sharing the best of Britain with their peers around the world and at the same time, the great thing is that they can get invaluable knowledge of what life is like in other countries. Connecting Classrooms will enable pupils to learn about the world around them, about the facts of poverty that face children their own age in developing countries, and how education can help eradicate poverty. It will also benefit teachers by enhancing their professional skills.'

The programme will also enable teachers from the partner schools to take part in exchange visits and work on classroom-based projects together, with the aim of giving young people a unique and hands-on international learning experience.

<<pictures show: LINING UP: Indian students who are part of the Connecting Classrooms project – a UK government and British Council education initiative. Also, students from Benjamin Britten High School.>>

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