Search

Famous wrecked boat revealed by super-low tides

PUBLISHED: 13:52 09 January 2020 | UPDATED: 08:40 10 January 2020

Part of what's left of the hull of the SS Fernebo on Cromer beach. Picture: ALAN TUTT

Part of what's left of the hull of the SS Fernebo on Cromer beach. Picture: ALAN TUTT

Archant

An unusually low tide has revealed the wreck of a boat at the centre of one of Norfolk’s most heroic rescues.

A view of the SS Fernebo's remains on Cromer beach. Picture: SWEDISH MARITME MUSEUMA view of the SS Fernebo's remains on Cromer beach. Picture: SWEDISH MARITME MUSEUM

The remains of the Swedish vessel SS Fernebo were spotted on Cromer's East Beach on January 9 - 103 years to the day since it was blown apart by an explosion near Cromer Pier.

One man was killed by the blast, possibly caused by a mine, but the 17 other sailors were rescued by famed lifeboatman Henry Blogg and his crew.

Richard Leeds, Mayor of Cromer and former RNLI lifeboat operations manager, said: "Quite a lot of people know about the wreck, it's just being there at the right time to see it.

"The best time for people to see it will be this weekend on Sunday. It is to do with a mixture of the tides and sand being swept over the wreck.

The remnants of one section of the SS Fernebo. Picture: Alison ToonThe remnants of one section of the SS Fernebo. Picture: Alison Toon

"I wouldn't say it has been seen more regularly over the last few years. It's an unusual sight and it doesn't get revealed at any particular time of year."

The last time the wreck was visible was on June 7, 2018.

You may also want to watch:

Photographs of the shipwreck were posted on the Cromer Museum Facebook page, along with an account of the rescue.

The remnants of one section of the SS Fernebo. Picture: Alison ToonThe remnants of one section of the SS Fernebo. Picture: Alison Toon

The 70m (230ft) steamer Fernebo was carrying a cargo of timber to London from Gävle in Sweden - which remained neutral throughout the war - when it ran into trouble in gales and rough seas.

When it broke apart, one half of the boat drifted with six crew on board towards shore, where the crowd of onlookers that had formed made a human chain to rescue them.

The 11 men on the other half were saved by Mr Blogg and his crew. The team received medals from the RNLI for their efforts during the 14-hour rescue.

The sailor who died in the explosion, engineer Johan Adolf Anderson, washed up at Mundesley, where he is buried.


If you value what this story gives you, please consider supporting the Eastern Daily Press. Click the link in the orange box above for details.

Become a supporter

This newspaper has been a central part of community life for many years. Our industry faces testing times, which is why we're asking for your support. Every contribution will help us continue to produce local journalism that makes a measurable difference to our community.

Latest from the Eastern Daily Press