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Remembering the lost pubs of Norwich: which have shut their doors?

PUBLISHED: 10:00 17 October 2020 | UPDATED: 10:54 17 October 2020

Royal Oak Sprowston/The Ironmongers Arms/Fruiterers Arms. Picture: Archant library

Royal Oak Sprowston/The Ironmongers Arms/Fruiterers Arms. Picture: Archant library

Archant library

Do you remember when these Norwich pubs were open?

The Ironmongers Arms in July 1985, now you may know it as The Iron House. Photo: EDP/Evening News ArchiveThe Ironmongers Arms in July 1985, now you may know it as The Iron House. Photo: EDP/Evening News Archive

Ironmongers Arms

The Ironmongers Arms was situated on Lobster Lane, and served customers from the 1960s right up until 2003. It had previously been a Bullards Brewery of Norwich pub. These days you’d recognise the location as the home of The Iron House.

Fruiterers Arms

The Fruiterers Arms, on White Lion Street in 1991 is now a W. H. Smith Photo: ArchantThe Fruiterers Arms, on White Lion Street in 1991 is now a W. H. Smith Photo: Archant

This pub was around back in the 16th century and is Grade-II listed. You would have found it at 2-4 White Lion Street. Back in the day, the pub used to have a six-day licence up until it closed in December 1989. Now, you would find a WH Smith in its place.

Boars Head

You would find the Boars Head at 2 Surrey Street; it dates back to around 1844 when Edward Reynolds was the publican. The 15th century building was damaged in an air raid in 1942. After 10 years of remaining in a poor state, a new building opened in the 50s but it finally shut its doors for good in 1974.

Queen Charlotte

The Old Boars Head on Surrey Street was a 15th century building Photo: ArchantThe Old Boars Head on Surrey Street was a 15th century building Photo: Archant

This pub lived on Dereham Road and changed its name several times. You may know it as The Lord Nelson, the Artful Dodger or the Dodgers Karaoke Café and Bar. This pub closed its doors in 2009 and has since been converted into a centre for the Norwich and Norfolk Muslim Association.

Rosary Tavern

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The Rosary Tavern was situated at 95 Rosary Road from the early 19th century until it closed in 2009. It used to be a regular Good Beer Guide entry pub in the 2000s. Since then, the pub has changed to private residential use.

Did you go for a pint in the Queen Charlotte pub on Dereham Road?  Photo: Nick ButcherDid you go for a pint in the Queen Charlotte pub on Dereham Road? Photo: Nick Butcher

Royal Oak

The Royal Oak was situated on North Walsham Road, just on the outskirts of Norwich in Old Catton. This pub closed in 2012 and the building was converted into offices. Royal Oak was in its prime in the early 2000s and the pub dated back to at least 1830.

The Rosary Tavern pub poured pints from the early nineteenth century until it closed in 2009 Photo: Denise BradleyThe Rosary Tavern pub poured pints from the early nineteenth century until it closed in 2009 Photo: Denise Bradley

The Royal Oak pub dates back to at least 1830. Photo: ArchantThe Royal Oak pub dates back to at least 1830. Photo: Archant


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