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Flats plan for Lord Kelvin pub in King’s Lynn

PUBLISHED: 14:38 15 November 2018 | UPDATED: 14:38 15 November 2018

The Lord Kelvin pub, in King's Lynn. Picture: Chris Bishop

The Lord Kelvin pub, in King's Lynn. Picture: Chris Bishop

Archant

A former pub which has stood empty for more than two years could be turned into flats.

The Lord Kelvin pub, in King's Lynn. Picture: Chris BishopThe Lord Kelvin pub, in King's Lynn. Picture: Chris Bishop

Developers have applied to convert the Lord Kelvin on Market Street, King’s Lynn, into appartments.

They say residential is the only sustainable future use for the property, which was put up for sale in early 2017.

A planning statement says: “Whilst a fair amount of interest was received from parties considering a range of different uses for the property, the majority of these were ultimately put off by the poor condition of the property.”

It adds just two offers were received and the Kelvin was put up for auction with a guide price of £165,000.

A sign at the Lord Kelvin pub, in King's Lynn. Picture: Chris BishopA sign at the Lord Kelvin pub, in King's Lynn. Picture: Chris Bishop

“The property has had a fair chance of being marketed to and taken up by somebody in the commercial world and at an appropriately set level,” the statement by King’s Lynn-based architect Richard Waite says.

“This process has clearly demonstrated that there is no appetite for taking on this building in a commercial way, either as a pub or indeed any other commercial use. The use as a public house has clearly failed and proven not currently viable as a venture.”

Owner Metropol Homes wants to turn the Kelvin into five one-bedroom apartments.

The architect adds: “The building occupies a prominent position in the Conservation Area and should be retained. The structure is deteriorating and requires significant investment in proper repairs and renovation which can only be realistically achieved and justified as part of a commercial venture to convert the building into apartments.”

The boarded-up pub stands next to Lynn Museum and at the entrance to the town’s bus station.

With an adjoining house, it is all that is left of market Street, whose buildings were demolished in the 20th Century.

Built in the 19th Century, it was named after physicist William Thomson, 1st Baron Kelvin (1824–1907), who developed the absolute temperature scale named after him. A sign featuring his portrait still hangs outside it.

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