Loos in King’s Lynn and West Norfolk could be closed or leased out to save money

The King's Lynn Corn Exchange. Picture: Ian Burt

The King's Lynn Corn Exchange. Picture: Ian Burt - Credit: Ian Burt

Public toilets across West Norfolk could be closed, leased out to private contractors or handed over to parishes to run, as the district council tries to cut the number of pennies it spends.

Ferry Street toilets, which could be closed on weekdays to save money. Picture: Chris Bishop

Ferry Street toilets, which could be closed on weekdays to save money. Picture: Chris Bishop - Credit: Archant

A report to councillors says the King's Lynn-based authority operates 22 public conveniences, adding: 'The council has a budget gap to meet in the next five years and the cost of public toilets is £374,000 per annum.'

A special working group has met three times to discuss where savings can be made. The report says that providing toilets is not 'a statutory responsibility for the borough council'.

Councillors on West Norfolk's environment and community panel will meet on Wednesday night to discuss proposals from the working party.

They include:

Leasing loos at Seagate and Hunstanton's Central Promenade to a private contractor, who would charge for admission.

Asking parish councils to take over the running of toilets in Heacham village, Old Hunstanton, Holme, Burnham Market and Downham Market.

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Closing toilets on Ferry Street, in King's Lynn, between Monday and Friday, with the public allowed to use those in the nearby Corn Exchange.

Closing toilets in Gaywood, with the public directed to those in the nearby library instead.

Charging people to use the toilets in The Walks as a 'special expense'.

The report says the proposals would save West Norfolk council up to £60,000 a year. If councillors on the environment and community panel agree to its recommendations, the council's ruling cabinet will have the final say over whether they should go ahead. The changes would come into force in April 2018 if they agree.

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