London Motorcycle Museum chairman visits Lowestoft on charity ride to save attraction

James Crosby, chairman of London Motorcycle Museum in Lowestoft. Picture: Clive Scarfe

James Crosby, chairman of London Motorcycle Museum in Lowestoft. Picture: Clive Scarfe - Credit: Clive Scarfe

The chairman of a motorcycle museum has visited Lowestoft, as he looks to raise funds to save the attraction.

James Crosby, chairman of London Motorcycle Museum in Lowestoft. Picture: Clive Scarfe

James Crosby, chairman of London Motorcycle Museum in Lowestoft. Picture: Clive Scarfe - Credit: Clive Scarfe

The London Motorcycle Museum in the capital has been placed into jeopardy after losing out on rent subsidies for its building, meaning it may be forced to either move or close.

Now, its chairman, James Crosby, whose father Bill established the museum, has set off on a journey to try and raise the funds to keep the museum where it is.

He is following in the tyre marks of Edward Turner, Triumph motorcycle designer, who rode from Land's End to John O'Groats in the 1950s.

However, he has slightly adapted his route to the one followed by Mr Turner, bringing the 35-year-old to Britain's four furthest points of the compass.


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This brought him to Lowestoft - England's most easterly point - as he rides on a vintage 1964 198cc Triumph Tiger Cub around England and Scotland.

He said: 'The museum opened in 1992, but my father and I were on site for two years before it opened getting everything sorted for it, so we both have a very emotional attachment to the place.

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'The Cub has certainly turned more than a few heads on the way - mainly because it's quite loud. However, I've also had lots of people telling me their memories of having one in the past, which is always really nice to hear about.'

His journey has not been without its challenges, however - in the early stages of the trip he bent an exhaust valve, while travelling north from Lowestoft he also suffered electrical failures. However, none of these setbacks have stopped him.

He added: 'I will make it to John O'Groats even if I have to push the bike there.

'The whole journey will cover around 2,500 miles and I'm hoping to make £1 for each mile I do. So far I've made just shy of £1,000 so hopefully I will get there.'

Pippa Crosby, Mr Crosby's mother, said: 'I think it is a brilliant thing he is doing and it's bound to be a lovely adventure for him.

'It will also be a nice way to show people they can do longer journeys on classic bikes, as most people tend to only use them on the weekends, but you can definitely do the miles on them.'

To support his journey and the museum, visit its website - www.london-motorcycle-museum.org.

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