Revealed: The north Norfolk public toilets which could close

Public toilets in Sheringham in Lushers Passage. Picture: MARK BULLIMORE

Public toilets in Sheringham in Lushers Passage. Picture: MARK BULLIMORE

North Norfolk District Council (NNDC) has identified its five toilet blocks which could be scrapped or redeveloped.

Public toilets in Stalham beside the town hall in the town. Picture: MARK BULLIMORE

Public toilets in Stalham beside the town hall in the town. Picture: MARK BULLIMORE

They are: St Paul's Lane, Overstrand; under the Melbourne slope, Cromer; Lusher's Passage, Sheringham; Highfield Road, Fakenham, and Wells Quay.

The sites were named after councillors asked for more information about a £450,000 public conveniences redevelopment scheme in NNDC's proposed budget for 2016-2017.

Duncan Ellis, the council's head of assets and leisure, said NNDC had been talking to Overstrand Parish Council about the possibility of transferring the village toilets to its care.

Cromer already had refurbished and award-winning toilets on Cromer Pier, plus new facilities planned as part of the west prom regeneration project.

The public toilets on Beach Road near Wells Quay. Picture: Matthew Usher.

The public toilets on Beach Road near Wells Quay. Picture: Matthew Usher.


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'The toilets under the Melbourne slope are therefore potentially surplus to requirements so maybe they could become a café, or concession,' said Mr Ellis.

The Lusher's Passage toilets could also be surplus with the provision of new facilities, in the redeveloped Sheringham Tourist Information Centre, And Sheringham also had award-winning toilets on its east promenade.

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The sites at Stalham, Fakenham and Wells were also under review.

Pauline Grove Jones, who represents Stalham, said her town had already lost its two banks.

The toilets in Highfield Road car park, in fakenham. Picture: Chris Bishop

The toilets in Highfield Road car park, in fakenham. Picture: Chris Bishop - Credit: Archant

'If we lose our public toilets too it will be another kick in the whatsits,' she said.

NNDC director Steve Blatch said the current Stalham toilets were in a poor-quality building, tucked away and subject to vandalism.

Among options, the council was looking at other public buildings to see whether they could be better used.

Mr Ellis said NNDC did not have to provide public toilets but did so because it was good for tourism.

But its 39 public conveniences cost £675,000 annually to run.

Many were dated and their maintenance was a 'huge challenge'.

One idea being explored by the council was talking to businesses such as pubs and cafés to see whether they would provide public toilets.

But North Walsham councillor Virginia Gay warned: 'Any administration that seeks to close public conveniences will find itself in the middle of a quite considerable battleground.'

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