Revealed: How much each party spent trying to get your vote in Norfolk and Suffolk at the last General Election

The Conservative's Chloe Smith and Labour's Clive Lewis debating before the 2015 General Election. P

The Conservative's Chloe Smith and Labour's Clive Lewis debating before the 2015 General Election. Picture: DENISE BRADLEY - Credit: Copyright: Archant 2015

How badly the political parties wanted your vote at the last General Election in 2015 depended on where you lived.

https://infogr.am/total_spending_in_each_constituency_by_party

The Conservatives spent close to the allowed limit in the weeks leading up to the vote on May 7 in the marginal seats of Great Yarmouth and Ipswich where they saw off threats from Labour.

They also spent big sums in Norwich North, where Chloe Smith held her seat from a Labour challenge, North East Cambs, where they feared a UKIP surge, and Waveney where Labour failed to dethrone Peter Aldous.

But the seat where the parties spent the most cash was the hotly-contested Norwich South.

Labour, the Greens, Liberal Democrats and the Conservatives all put five-figure sums into the constituency, which Labour's Clive Lewis took from the Liberal Democrats. The money went on advertising, staffing and campaign expenses.

The Norwich South election count at St Andrews Hall. The seat saw the biggest spending by the partie

The Norwich South election count at St Andrews Hall. The seat saw the biggest spending by the parties. Photo: Steve Adams


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It was the only seat which the Green Party put significant money into, spending almost £27,000 trying to get their candidate Lesley Grahame elected. But she finished in third place behind Labour and the Conservatives.

The Lib Dems focused their financial firepower on the two seats in the region where they had MPs sitting in 2015 - North Norfolk, which Norman Lamb held for them, and Norwich South, where their vote collapsed and Simon Wright finished fourth.

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They put almost £33,000 into Mr Lamb's campaign and almost £25,000 into Norwich South.

UKIP fancied their chances in North East Cambs and Great Yarmouth, putting around £21,000 into each campaign. They came second in North East Cambs and third in Great Yarmouth.

Peter Aldous held Waveney for the Conservatives where his party and Labour both spent more than �30,

Peter Aldous held Waveney for the Conservatives where his party and Labour both spent more than �30,000 each. Photo: Archant - Credit: Nick Butcher

Labour hoped to gain Great Yarmouth, Waveney and Norwich North from the Conservatives, but failed in all three seats. They put more than £47,000 into their Great Yarmouth campaign, another £29,600 into Norwich North and £30,400 into Waveney.

Their money did pay off in Norwich South, however, where they put in the second highest figure after Great Yarmouth and got Clive Lewis elected.

They spent close to the total allowed in Yarmouth and Norwich South.

The Conservatives also spent close to the allowed limit in Yarmouth to hold Brandon Lewis' seat.

Great Yarmouth MP Brandon Lewis held the seat for the Conservatives despite big spending by Labour a

Great Yarmouth MP Brandon Lewis held the seat for the Conservatives despite big spending by Labour and UKIP. Picture: James Bass - Credit: James Bass

The safest seats saw the smallest sums spent on them. South West Norfolk, held by Elizabeth Truss for the Tories with a majority of almost 14,000, attracted the least amount of cash from the parties.

Under party spending rules, the Electoral Commission divides party spending into 'the long campaign' and 'short campaign'.

Parties can spend more in the long campaign - £30,700 plus up to 9p per registered voter - which at the last election ran from December 19 2014 to the dissolution of Parliament on March 30 2015.

The remaining weeks leading up to polling day are called the 'short campaign' where candidates can spend £8,700 plus up to 9p per registered voter.

The data in this article was compiled from the Electoral Commission website by adding together the totals spent in the long campaign and the short campaign.

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