Election debate: North Norfolk candidates answer your questions

North Norfolk election candidates (l-r) Norman Lamb (Liberal Democrats), Ann Steward (Conservative),

North Norfolk election candidates (l-r) Norman Lamb (Liberal Democrats), Ann Steward (Conservative), Michael Macartney-Filgate (Green), Denise Burke (Labour), Michael Baker (UKIP) - Credit: Archant

Our third Election debate with your local candidates saw the North Norfolk hopefuls answer your questions.

Ann Steward (Conservative), Denise Burke (Labour), Michael Baker (UKIP), Michael Macartney-Filgate (Green) and Norman Lamb (Lib Dem) all took part in Tuesday's debate.

You can read the list of questions and answers below.

• First question is from Mollie Whitworth from North Walsham. She has asked: When the inadequately regulated banks in the U.S.A. and elsewhere caused the 2008 crash, the Labour Government bailed out the British banks adding scores of billions of pounds to the nation's debt. Were they correct to do so or should they have allowed the banks to go bust?


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No quick answer to this one. Allowing a bank to go bust can have serious repercussions. However not all banks are the same, the larger the bank the more serious the potential repercussions. Each case needs to be evaluated and their background investments and deposits need to be considered. Having bailed a bank out there should be future severe penalties put in place against it.

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by UKIP: Michael Baker

The labour government left Britain with the biggest financial deficit since the second world war. It should never have got to the stage it did. The Conservative government has clamped down on the banking industry, and will continue to regulate. We should not have got to this stage.

by Conservative: Ann Steward

We really had no choice.

However better controls should have been put in place since - the banks continue to make fast sums and pay out enormous bonuses. We need to reform the banking system in this country.

Labour will introduce a British Investment Bank and support a network of regional banks

by Labour: Denise Burke

They had to take emergency action to save the economy. The consequences of allowing the banks to go bust in terms of the functioning of the economy would have been disastrous. However, the failure to regulate banks properly with so called light touch regulation was disastrous and allowed risky behaviour to go unchallenged.

by Liberal Democrats: Norman Lamb

Hello Mollie as we saw in Iceland when the crash came, the people voted out a government that suggested they repay debts run up. The UK perhaps should have taken a more measured approach and ensured ordinary savers' money was safe, discussed matters with institutions and let some banks go bust. Greens believe that the subsequent quantitative easing should have been put towards green projects and Mark Carney of Bank of England told Caroline Lucas MP that could easily have happened instead of the money going to rich bankers and hedge fund managers.

by Green: Mike Macartney-Filgate

'Light touch' and' some controls' are suggested but have not happened under the current policies. Green economics suggest we have got it wrong hitherto. The public are paying for the mistakes of what was done in this country.

by Green: Mike Macartney-Filgate

We all like to think of the banking industry as the culprit, however it could well be down to staffing issues and poor regulation.

by UKIP: Michael Baker

A Conservative government is taking the right action for the longterm plan for the economy, and with the fastest growth in the G7 it is proving that with the right plan, it is working. We can only continue this plan with a Conservative majority.

by Conservative: Ann Steward

Firstly as Mollie says it was a banking crisis and not caused by Labour!

More robust banking regulation is required.

We have now been left with a much larger debt by the coalition

by Labour: Denise Burke

Labour's stewardship of the economy was disastrous. They said the were supremely relaxed about people being 'filthy rich', they failed to regulate the banks properly, they allowed massive personal debt and a housing bubble to develop. Vince Cable warned of the dangers of this at the time but the Labour Government failed to listen. Gordon Brown then failed to recognise for far too long that cuts to public spending would be necessary. its always the most vulnerable who lose out.

by Liberal Democrats: Norman Lamb

• Our next question comes from Jackson on Twitter. They want to know how you will get young people to vote on May 7, and why do so may politicians court the older person's vote.

We need to show that parliament is a more grown up affair. The behavior in the Commons is akin to badly behaved schoolchildren. Today's students are sick of this and are switching off. Grow up M.P's.

by UKIP: Michael Baker

The Green Party is attracting record numbers of young voters as we offer hope and a different way of doing things. Greens know that the planet has limits and that we are storing up a poor legacy for the future of our young people in the UK and around the world.

All ages of voters are important though and we need a more democratic system dare I suggest proportional Representation( remember the comments about coalitions being 'weak government'?

by Green: Mike Macartney-Filgate

As a mother of an 18 year old daughter, this is a discussion we have frequently! It is your future, and I am certainly very keen to engage with the young. I have been into many schools, talking about apprenticeships and also talking about career paths. I would like to see more political debates in schools, and I believe that social media evenings such as this are a great way to engage with you. Please do visit facebook and twitter and please ask questions..it is your country and your future and we need to engage with all.

by Conservative: Ann Steward

Not sure that's entirely true.

My pledge is to boost education and opportunities for young people.

That's why we will reduce tuition fees to £6000, provide a jobs guarantee for young people and ensure that though wanting to undertake apprenticeships have access to ones that are at least NVQ level 3 and fit for purpose

by Labour: Denise Burke

Politicians have a responsibility to engage with young people. I took part in a brilliant debate last night in Birmingham for Radio 1 Newsbeat. 100 young people with passionate views debated with politicians. The danger is that, if younger people dont vote, the political parties wont take their concerns seriously enough. The Lib Dems are proposing a two thirds discount on bus fares for 16 to 21 year olds.

by Liberal Democrats: Norman Lamb

All ages should feel able and engaged in UK politics enough to vote- that's why we all are standing surely. Offering choice to young and old alike. Green democracy seems to be appealing to younger voters, encouragingly.

by Green: Mike Macartney-Filgate

As usual the Labour answer does not actually refer to the question. UK I P would scrap tuition fees at university for the STEMM subjects science engineering , technology, maths and medicine.

by UKIP: Michael Baker

There is also youth parliaments which are becoming quite active in all parts of the country. I would like more invitations to debates in youth groups and I know a lot more young people are becoming a lot more interested. Don't know your age, but it would be great to see some younger politicians! Look at our policies and please do challenge us.

by Conservative: Ann Steward

During the last two weeks we have all attended a number of hustings across North Norfolk.

I have been heartened by the quality of questions from young people.

I do believe though that we could do more to engage with young people and look forward under a Labour government to the voting age reduced to 16.

Social media has certainly boosted interest at these elections and it's certainly the way forward!

by Labour: Denise Burke

On education, the Liberal Democrats are alone in committing to maintain funding in real terms per student in schools from pre school to college. we will commit £5bn more to education than the Conservatives and £2bn more than Labour over the course of the next Parliament. this is a vital investment in our future. The pupil premium which the Lib Dems got through in Government is now directing £2.5 bn to children from the poorest backgrounds and the attainment gap is starting to close.

by Liberal Democrats: Norman Lamb

• Our next question is from Benjie Cabbell-Manners in Cromer who asked: Given the extreme importance of seasonal tourism to North Norfolk , how would the outlawing of zero-hour contracts work in the industry? Paying large numbers of staff to come to work in the winter with nothing to do will, in effect, put many attractions and cafes out of business, with the loss of jobs.

Benjie's question assumes that the tourism industry has to work on zero hours contracts. Seasonal contracts where the employee knows that they have a definite income for the season are OK. It is when a worker does not know from day to day whether they will have employment that it is wrong and needs to be outlawed.

by UKIP: Michael Baker

There have been real abuses of zero hours contracts. The Lib Dems pushed through a ban on exclusivity clauses which outrageously prevented a worker from working for another employer even if they were offered no work by their main employer. But we would go further in looking at how workers who were effectively working full time hours but were on zero hours contracts could acquire a right to a full hours contract.

by Liberal Democrats: Norman Lamb

Look Labour have said that they will abolish zero hours contracts but they appreciate that in some industries like tourism where it is seasonal there is a demand.

So there will be exceptions, but they will ban exploitative zero-hours.

by Labour: Denise Burke

Zero-hour contracts work for a large number of people, certainly with the tourism and agricultural sector. My daughter at university frequently advises me that she needs this type of contract.

by Conservative: Ann Steward

The question about seasonal work and zero hours contracts is affecting tourist industries in lots of countries. we saw an interesting approach in Turkey recently where cheaper holidays out of season allowed tourist industries to keep staff on throughout the years.

How can a zero hours 'job' be a good job? The Green economy has lots of openings year'round for a wide range of skills and workers . We still believe zero hours contracts are not a job as you cannot pay with no money!

by Green: Mike Macartney-Filgate

Surely 'zero-hours' contracts are a ploy to massage the employment statistics.

Workers have rights, need training and apprenticeships to bring in fresh energies. UK employers seem to recognise this in some quarters and others not.

by Green: Mike Macartney-Filgate

There are those whose work is incidental to them as far as financial reward is concerned, in this case they will accept zero hours contracts for everyone else it could be life threatening. It is part of the Tories job creation.

by UKIP: Michael Baker

Zero hours contracts do work for some people but they offer no security for people on low pay. I am particularly concerned about zero hours contracts in care services where continuity of care is so vital. i want local authorities to commission care on the basis that providers should not rely on these contracts. The best providers offer salaries to care staff and reward them fairly and many are now starting to pay the living wage. we should encourage this.

by Liberal Democrats: Norman Lamb

Individuals simply can't rely on a mismatch of zero hour contracts. It makes it difficult to assess for in-work benefits, childcare, even mortgages.

Most want to have a sustainable job paying a decent living wage

by Labour: Denise Burke

To abolish the system would be detrimental to some industries, and the Conservative government will continue with the longterm plan of creating job opportunities for all. We have already delivered 1000 jobs everyday and will deliver more apprenticeships.

by Conservative: Ann Steward

• Back to the economy, Malcom France in Cromer highlighted that when the Labour government left office in 2010, they left a note to the effect that all the money had gone. He wants to know what will the candidates do to ensure the integrity of the UK economy in the next parliament?

We need to balance the books. Then we need to start paying down the national debt. Until this happens we will be at the mercy of the inevitable increase in interest rates in the future. Presently government debt interest payments exceed the defence budget, it cannot be allowed to continue. We are mortgaging our children's and grand children's futures.

by UKIP: Michael Baker

Let's have a close look at Green economics that take account of the limits of the planet, recognise that resources cannot stretch to all of us, yet suggest that the current systems of printing money, allowing the gap between rich and poor to widen and selling off public services that we have already put money naside for in trust ( through taxes) are failing.

If GDP could help in this , but it cannot yet we cling to that outdated measure of a country's 'well-being'.

by Green: Mike Macartney-Filgate

The situation in 2010 was disastrous. We were on the edge of the precipice spending in a year more than £150bn more than we were bringing in in taxes. We had to get public finances under control and the country is in a far better position economically now with record levels of employment. However, we have to finish the task of clearing the deficit but we have to do it fairly. We would cut less than the Tories and borrow less than Labour.

by Liberal Democrats: Norman Lamb

It is important to have a longterm plan, and this is about a strong economy. You are right to say that all the money had gone, and it has been tough. Other parties have not shown they have a good economic plan for business growth, and the only way to continue is with a Conservative majority. We will continue to deliver more jobs, more apprenticeships and support businesses with low taxes.

by Conservative: Ann Steward

Well there's likely to be another note left by the coalition this time as this country has been left in even more debt! And borrowing at £75 billion this year!

by Labour: Denise Burke

Norman says we had to get the finances under control. In the coalition's 5 year tenure they doubled the national debt and continue to run an annual deficit of £90bn. Not a good record. He wishes to finish the task I hope they would start the task. Scrap HS2 and save £50bn for a start.

by UKIP: Michael Baker

Who created and says there is a deficit I wonder- surely the same people who got us into the ness of 'no more money' - so where have all our taxes gone then.

We also suggest- again- that we can ill afford Trident renewal ( £13 billion) when austerity measures seem to mean all our key services- health, education, housing, transport , social care, welfare , foreign aid etc. are under threat and being drastically reduced.

by Green: Mike Macartney-Filgate

My real fear with the Conservative plan is that they would clear the deficit entirely by cuts. they have promised £12bn of cuts to welfare without any indication at all about where those cuts will fall. my fear is that disabled people and those suffering mental ill health will suffer. They surely have a responsibility to be clear with the public. My fear with Labour is that they would lose the discipline we have followed. if you lose control of finances the vulnerable always suffer the most.

by Liberal Democrats: Norman Lamb

The coalition promised to balance the books in this Parliament but this promise has been broken.

Labour's plan to balance the books means making tough but fair choices. We will reverse the top-rate tax cut so that the highest one per cent of earners with income over £150,000 contribute more to help get the deficit down.

by Labour: Denise Burke

We have a strong leader, and a credible plan. Let us continue to secure a better future for you, for your family and for Britain. A vote for anyone else is a vote for chaos.

by Conservative: Ann Steward

• Now a question on immigration. June McDonald, from Trimingham, wants to know if the candidates accept that public services are overstretched (doctors, hospitals, transport) because of the volume of people being allowed into the country?

Last year we had net inward migration of 298,000. These people, whether you agree with controlling immigration or not, need doctors, hospitals, schools, transport etc. So whilst immigration may not be the sole cause of the problems it is certainly a major contributory factor.

by UKIP: Michael Baker

It does not seem fair to keep blaming ' the volume of people being allowed into the country' for the ills of a range of our economic people, pressures of population and the real and actual l9mits of a small country.

Numbers of people coming in also need and want to return to their own countries, just as we would.

Let's welcome people with a wide range of skills, as Britain always has and be proud of this country as a haven- if the USA can why don't we?

by Green: Mike Macartney-Filgate

Public services are overstretched but not because of immigration.

Immigration in North Norfolk is at 4% and without those immigrant workers our care system, hospitals, farming industry and tourist industry would suffer.

The NHS is in crisis because of the coalition government's lack of investment and desire to privatise the NHS.

by Labour: Denise Burke

Regarding health, people are living longer, and of course this is adding to more pressure on the NHS. The Conservatives have already invested £7bn in the NHS over this term of parliament, and have pledged £8bn for the next parliament. We have invested in A47 and A11 and there is more to do, I will also stand up and fight for better rural transport.

by Conservative: Ann Steward

I accept concerns about pressure on public services but we must have a balanced debate about immigration. The Lib Dems would ensure we had proper border controls so that we knew who had overstayed - one of the big problems is of people coming on short visas and not leaving. we have no way of telling whether they have gone or not. However, our public services - particularly the NHS and care services rely on people coming to this country to work. Care in Norfolk would collapse with them. they are generally incredibly dedicated people.

by Liberal Democrats: Norman Lamb

As you see from all of us- the pressures on public services cannot really be blamed upon visitors and those from other countries- the true strength of a modern country is its diversity of people surely?

by Green: Mike Macartney-Filgate

Economists are clear that people coming to this country from Europe to work benefits our economy but we have to end the practice of migrant workers being able to claim child benefit and sending it back to their home country if their children have remained there. People who come to work are welcome. We have ended the practice of people being able to claim benefits as soon as they arrive.

by Liberal Democrats: Norman Lamb

Labour has pledged to bring the NHS back to life!

In North Norfolk mental health services are non existent and our nearest A&E is some 45 minutes away.

The CCG is required to make more cuts which will be even more damaging to health services here.

What has our current MP, a health minister done? Very little!

by Labour: Denise Burke

To run a country effectively you need to know who is living in it. At present we do not know it is estimated that there may well be 2million unaccounted for. It seems strange that for each of the cattle in this country we know who what where why but for the population we know none of these statistics.

by UKIP: Michael Baker

I do believe that we need to look at joining up the health and care sector in a better way.

and we will do this.

by Conservative: Ann Steward

• Now a question on our county. Richard Shepherd, from Sheringham, wants to know what the candidates have done to promote Norfolk's food and fame as regards to fishing and farming?

We trumpet to all who will listen that we live in a superb area and our key assets lie in the Broads area ( where I have lived for for over 30 years). We invite people to stay in the area and share the locations of organic producers, fisherfolk and other businesses and local people who give Norfolk its deserved fame!

It is a very Green county after all.

by Green: Mike Macartney-Filgate

Just look at my businesses. We promote local produce and local suppliers and growers and have a national reputation for our food offering. We have been recognised in local and national competition for our achievements. THis I will continue to do. Thank you for the question Dick!

by UKIP: Michael Baker

I have collaborated with other Norfolk MPs in showcasing Norfolk's amazing food and beverages in Parliament. I have worked with barley growers to get a better deal for them. i have worked with local fishermen in negotiating agreements with offshore wind farm companies to ensure that their interests are protected. My favourite cheeses are Binham Blue and Norfolk Dapple - both from North Norfolk!

by Liberal Democrats: Norman Lamb

Our food to fork is very important to North Norfolk - our fishing and farming is the backbone to local jobs.

We need to promote our fabulous industries and more needs to be done.

by Labour: Denise Burke

For 30 years I have been married to a farmer, and know and understand the industry. Farming is huge in North Norfolk, and I have worked closely with the sector promoting the many apprenticeship and job opportunities. We know that there are required in the region of 60,000 people needed for the industry which is high tech and I have been actively going into schools talking about the 200 career opportunities.

Fishing seems to have been forgotten, and I have already met with the fishermen and pledged to work with them and get their voices into Westminster. It is a huge industry and offers enormous supply chain opportunities.

by Conservative: Ann Steward

I think we all do our bit.

by UKIP: Michael Baker

So lots being done and we are all justifiably proud of the county and what it produces. Delighted to call Norfolk home and to enjoy such rich and varied produce. When we briefly moved to Pembrokeshire it seemed a veritable desert compared to here!

We have lots of organic growers and producers and small fisher folk who come up against the misuse of our seas off our shores- these also need protecting.

by Green: Mike Macartney-Filgate

Our Secretary of State Elizabeth Truss has been extremely active in promoting Norfolk's food and farming offer, and I am pleased that the Local Enterprise Partnership has this on their list to enable Food Enterprise Zones to happen here and promote Norfolk's fantastic food and farming produce. I will certainly continue to raise the profile of the fantastic job the industry does for the whole supply chain.

by Conservative: Ann Steward

I think we are largely in agreement on this one. Farming and fishing are two vital local industries. And people who come to North Norfolk often come, in part, because of the wonderful local food and drink available. We also have many good restaurants and pubs which help to enhance the area for visitors and residents.

by Liberal Democrats: Norman Lamb

What is amazing in North Norfolk is that many of our restaurants really do promote local produce.

Indeed when I appeared on Come Dine with Me I made sure that all of my dishes were prepared using local fish and produce - just a shame I didn't win!

Why would you want to eat anything but locally sourced produce?

by Labour: Denise Burke

• Now on to a different topic: Sally Blaikie wants to hear all the candidates' views on renewable energy.

Green Party policy and my views as well are that we need more renewables from a range or sources - wind, wave and tidal and solar are all vital to energy security and also can help us acxhieve savings in energy and carbon levels.

We also need to insulate homes and businesses better and encourage developments in these areas instead of the chase for ever more difficult sources such as oil. No fracking here for sure.

Nuclear power is heavily subsidised and owned and set up by other countries yet we run the risks of Chernobyl etc.!

by Green: Mike Macartney-Filgate

Renewable energy is all fair and well as long as it is not subsidised by the public. Few, if any, of our turbines and solar panels would be installed without the enormous subsidies they receive. As far as being green is concerned a carbon audit of an installed wind turbine shows it to be a most inefficient means of saving the planet. We should be building the next generation of nuclear power stations.

by UKIP: Michael Baker

We need a good mix of all types of energy. Offshore wind is a real growth area in Norfolk, and offers a tremendous opportunity for clean energy and jobs. Solar panels are becoming increasingly popular, and with farmers now able to put these on farm buildings it will help us create more for the future.

by Conservative: Ann Steward

Another one of my pledges is to promote renewable energy, both onshore and off shore however I do oppose fracking which I believe would be disastrous for us in North Norfolk.

by Labour: Denise Burke

We have to promote renewable energy. the threat of global warming is very real and North Norfolk is on the front line with large areas at or below sea level. with sea levels rising by up to a meter over the next 100 years this poses a very real threat. Also, we have a direct interest in becoming more energy self sufficient. The Liberal Democrats in Government have made real progress in substantially increasing the amount of energy generated from renewables - often against strong opposition from Conservatives who seemed to lose their green interest in government.

by Liberal Democrats: Norman Lamb

On offshore wind, this has generated many local jobs in Norfolk. The Sheringham Shoal windfarm has created many new jobs in the Wells area and has helped local businesses who benefited during the construction. On shore wind energy also has a role but we have to be sensitive to protecting areas of beauty.

by Liberal Democrats: Norman Lamb

I do not agree with Norman Lambs view that the Conservatives have held up the amount of energy generated from renewables. Look at Sheringham and also Gt Yarmouth and Lowestoft, the Conservatives have supported this investment the whole way, as have I personally with my previous role in economic development at Norfolk County Council. Incorrect Norman!

by Conservative: Ann Steward

We therefore need governments to sign up to real savings in carbon levels to reduce the risk of global warming. remember that sea rises follow and the melting of icecaps also releases methane that will accelerate the processes rightly identified by all of us as causing problems.

We live in a county that our Green spoke, Rupert Read has dubbed 'the energy coast' so lets get cracking ( NOT fracking).

by Green: Mike Macartney-Filgate

Fracking would not, of course, be disastrous for North Norfolk. The geological structure indicates there is no measurable recoverable gas in North Norfolk. Fracking is an established business for many years with few problems those that have occurred are down to poor regulation. We need our own energy security.

by UKIP: Michael Baker

Labour will create an Energy Security Board to plan and deliver the energy mix we need, including renewables, solar and nuclear.

And the additional jobs will be good for North Norfolk too!

by Labour: Denise Burke

• Bit more controversial now, Jane Crossen wants to know if any of the parties foresee a situation where there will be a referendum for the return of capital punishment.

A very simple answer - I hope not, capital punishment is a very emotive subject.

by Labour: Denise Burke

The Conservatives have pledged to hold an in/out referendum for Europe and this is the only referendum we have planned. We are the only party that can offer this. Under this Conservative-led government crime is down 20% and we need to continue this.

by Conservative: Ann Steward

I and the Green Party are completely opposed to capital punishment.

I have heard it said that if we left Europe and got a taste for refernda there could be such a referendum.

However, since it was abolished there has been a consistent free vote in Parliament against capital punishment as there should be. %This is a civilised country surely and capital punishment is barbaric- public revenge is not a pretty sight.

by Green: Mike Macartney-Filgate

I hope not. I would not support a referendum on capital punishment. I believe that for the state to kill people is barbaric. it is horrifying how many people are killed in some US states. And there is no evidence that it does anything to reduce crime. You end up with people on death row for years. We are a civilised nation. People must be effectively punished for dreadful crimes but no to the death penalty!

by Liberal Democrats: Norman Lamb

It is a fact that a substantial percentage of the population would like to see the return of capital punishment, in certain cases. However the elected parliament continues to thwart the idea of such a debate. Maybe there should be a referendum if a major terrorist atrocity occurs.

by UKIP: Michael Baker

I wonder how those who are vehemently against capital punishment would speak to those people whose loved one has been killed by a murderer who has served time and been released?

by UKIP: Michael Baker

I'm totally opposed to capital punishment.

The punishment must fit the crime but a life for a life is not the answer.

by Labour: Denise Burke

Public policy should not be on the tails surely of ' a terrorist outrage'.

Our democracy and peace are not only hard won but also highly precious.

This is not a police state yet I think ( unless I have missed too many undemocratic changes- Habeus corpus,Human Rights Act ? anyone?).

Equally I wonder how many people have been to the USA and sat on Death Row with a prisoner threatened with 'capital punishment'?

by Green: Mike Macartney-Filgate

Crime is down and this is very good news. But we must never be complacent. I was very pleased to read this week that violent crime is down and that it is believed that a reduction in binge drinking may be the reason. We need a real focus on stopping reoffending. Too many people who go in to prison for short sentences come out and offend again. I am also a strong believer in restorative justice which forces offenders to confront their offending.

by Liberal Democrats: Norman Lamb

• New question now: Val Bond, from Overstrand, wants to know why people should be given the opportunity to buy housing association houses at a cost apparently subsidised by every taxpayer? She says the scheme reduces the stock of houses that people can afford to rent.

It is not sensible when you are in a position of shortage to sell the asset you are short of then consider replacing it. If you want a policy of council house sales and they are discounted then they should be treated as a financial asset and be taxed on the profit when resold. However let's have sufficient housing stock before we start selling it and not expect the taxpayer to subsidise the sale.

by UKIP: Michael Baker

The Conservatives believe in people owning their own home. Under labour, housing building collapsed to it's lowest since the 1920's. With the new policy, this will create opportunity for the money to be reinvested to build more houses. We have already built 700,000 houses this parliament and will build many more the next parliament.

by Conservative: Ann Steward

I totally agree with you, Val. This is a disastrous, ill thought through policy from the Conservatives. It is extraordinary that they are proposing to force charitable housing associations to sell homes which are there to meet a local need. And why should one group of tenants get a substantial windfall payment with up to £70,000 from the taxpayer when private tenants get nothing - but have to pay through their taxes to provide this windfall. and it will dangerously reduce the stock of rented low cost homes - when we need more!

by Liberal Democrats: Norman Lamb

I agree with Val!

We simply don't have enough social housing to meet demand in North Norfolk.

We need to invest more in social and affordable housing rather than depleting the stock we have.

We need to ensure that planners force developers to include social housing and affordable homes in any housing development plan.

by Labour: Denise Burke

We need to resume council house building not sell off the little we have left that Housing Associations are managing for our community.

Also there are too many empty brownfield sites ( they might one day be needed for business we have been told by the District Council). Lets get builders building social housing that is well -insulated and of good standard and start ending the tragedy of homelessness in Britain.

Successive governments seem to miss the chance to get housing sorted.

by Green: Mike Macartney-Filgate

Priorities and commonsense should rule our government thinking and at present the sale of public housing stock when in short supply is neither a priority nor common sense.

by UKIP: Michael Baker

We keep hearing about owning one's home but many people cannot even get a start at this. The rental sector is now growing and has passed the owning-their-own-home aspiration for young people (' The Big Issue' mag tells me.

Short life housing Project in Oxford in the '70s was a great idea and we need similar now!.

by Green: Mike Macartney-Filgate

The economics of this have not been thought through by the Conservatives. Rather than a right to buy, it has been dubbed a 'right to bribe'. I very much hope it never happens. However, we must do much more to enable people to own their own homes. a major house building programme and new garden towns and villages are proposed by the Lib Dems. Housing shortages is one of the biggest issues in my mailbag. We need homes for local families.

by Liberal Democrats: Norman Lamb

The Conservatives invested nearly £20billion into affordable housing, and has delivered over 217,000 new affordable homes across England. We are committed to keeping mortgage rates low and to more security for those who rent by encouraging longer, family friendly tenancies.

by Conservative: Ann Steward

House ownership is laudable but isn't for everyone.

Labour has committed to build 200,000 new homes but will ensure that there are adequate social housing included in development.

North Norfolk has it's fair share of second home owners while residents of North Norfolk struggle to find affordable properties. We'll cap private renters too

by Labour: Denise Burke

• Next question now, back to finance. Gordon Hobbs wants to know why banking chiefs get paid a bonus for doing a job they are already well paid to do?

I have always believed that the remuneration schemes in banking are impossible to justify. You hear claims that they need to pay these bonuses to attract the best talent - but just look at where that so called 'talent' has got us! We would levy additional tax on banks to help us clear the deficit and to ensure that we can properly fund public services.

by Liberal Democrats: Norman Lamb

Bank bonuses must be regulated and capped - you're right why should greedy bankers profit further.

by Labour: Denise Burke

Good question - and what do they do with our money too!

While we sleep millions of £s are invested so 'they' can make a profit.

Britain needs urgently to reform its banking sector otherwise it is a hollow claim to boast we are the financial capital ( London?) in Europe? the world? also we need to give a chance to graduates who have to leave to get work- bet they have goood financial brains too.

Reform banking and ask the public what they think should be rewarded. And do not forget Credit Unions .

by Green: Mike Macartney-Filgate

The Conservatives have clamped down on the banking industry and will continue to do so.

by Conservative: Ann Steward

I think this question should apply to any employee. The answer is that human nature responds to incentives. A straight salary with no incentive produces average results. The high starting salary of bankers is down to international demand. Before we vilify them too much. Why do we pay extortionate well paid footballers a bonus when they score a goal or when the team wins. You can't have it both ways.

by UKIP: Michael Baker

Footballers maybe give (some people?) more pleasure perhaps.

Bankers have ruined whole countries and still do not get what they are supposed to do right ( Greece? Iceland?- at least they are starting to look at monetary policy!)

by Green: Mike Macartney-Filgate

If you are going to further tax the bankers Norman what about footballers on 100's of thousands a week?

by UKIP: Michael Baker

We certainly need more competition in banking. it is interesting that in both the US and Germany there are large numbers of regional and local banks all offering finance to local enterprises. Compare this to the stranglehold of a few big banks in this country. we are also seeing the development of other sources of finance - including crowd sourcing using online initiatives. This will start to challenge the big banks.

by Liberal Democrats: Norman Lamb

Pay should be linked to a performance management system for all employees.

by Labour: Denise Burke

Interesting comment from UKIP...endorsement again about no support for Culture, arts and sport?

by Conservative: Ann Steward

• Our last question is perhaps the most important. Why should you be the next MP for North Norfolk?

I have been involved in the political scene of North Norfolk since the early 1980's. I run a successful family business employing around 300 local people. I am not dependent on an MP's pay therefore do not have to toe a line which is not in the interests of North Norfolk.

by UKIP: Michael Baker

North Norfolk needs a Green voice in Parliament to add to the calls and action for the county, its people, its environment and all the creatures herein for which we bear a great responsibility. Also our planet needs urgent action to save it as our widest home.

It is a great place to live and our family ( travelling and living in many countries over generations) call it home.

by Green: Mike Macartney-Filgate

I have 35 business experience, 12 years in local government, grown up and passionate about North Norfolk! U have already been fighting for Norfolk, and have been at the forefront of campaigns such as A11, A47 and Broadband. I have pledged to fight for our coastal community, and want to see a better rollout out of Broadband and mobile phone coverage. I will fight also to reduce and reform business rates. I have a track record of delivery, and will work tirelessly on your behalf. We need a Conservative majority to continue our strong economy and this seat is crucial to that.

Vote Steward 7th May

by Conservative: Ann Steward

Because I'm passionate about North Norfolk, our coast and countryside, our towns and villages.

I live and work here unlike some of the candidates.

I believe my previous experiences, being an ex-tax inspector, running my own small businesses can help me represent all residents in North Norfolk.

by Labour: Denise Burke

Just to respond to the two Mikes, Bradley Johnson gives me more pleasure than a banker!!! I would continue to put body and soul into this job if re-elected giving a voice to those who are battling against bureaucracy or who are fighting other personal battles. I will also continue to fight for our coastal communities to achieve social justice. Nationally, I will do all I can to maintain the discipline of clearing the deficit but crucially doing it fairly.

by Liberal Democrats: Norman Lamb

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